Peach season is in full swing (I spied this beauties -- direct from Coloma, Mich. -- on Saturday, at the East Town Market in Milwaukee). Take advantage with this can't-miss cobbler recipe. I've never made a better one.

 

PEACH COBBLER

Serves 6 to 8.

Note: From Williams-Sonoma.

For dough:

1 1/4 c. flour

1/3 c. sugar

1/4 tsp. salt

7 tbsp. cold unsalted butter, cut into ¼-inch
 cubes

1 egg yolk

1 tsp. vanilla extract

2 tbsp. very cold water

For cobbler:

3 lb. peaches, peeled, pitted and each cut into 8
 slices

1/4 c. plus 2 tbsp. plus 1 tsp. granulated sugar, divided

1/4 c. plus 2 tbsp. firmly packed light brown
 sugar

2 1/2 tbsp. cornstarch

2 tsp. fresh lemon juice

1/4 tsp. freshly grated nutmeg

1 tbsp. unsalted butter, cut into small pieces

1 egg, lightly beaten

Vanilla ice cream for serving

Directions

To prepare dough: In a food processor fitted with a metal blade, combine flour, sugar and salt and pulse just to combine. Add butter and pulse until mixture resembles coarse cornmeal, with butter pieces no larger than small peas.

In a small bowl, whisk together egg yolk, vanilla and cold water. Add egg mixture to flour mixture and pulse just until dough pulls together; do not overmix.

Transfer dough to a work surface, pat into a ball and flatten into a disk. Wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes.

To prepare cobbler: When ready to bake, preheat an oven to 425 degrees.

In a large bowl, stir together peaches, 1/4 cup plus 2 Tbs. granulated sugar, the brown sugar, cornstarch, lemon juice and nutmeg. Transfer to a 2-quart rectangular baking dish and scatter butter pieces on top.

On a lightly floured work surface, roll out cobbler dough to a ¼-inch thickness. Tear dough into 3-inch pieces and place on top of peach filling. Brush dough with beaten egg and sprinkle with remaining 1 tablespoon sugar.

Bake cobbler for 10 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 350ºF and bake until topping is browned, 50 to 60 minutes more. 

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