Per an ESPN.com report, which corroborates a Pro Football Talk report, LSU cornerback Morris Claiborne reportedly scored a 4 on his Wonderlic Test. If the high score was 5, that would be pretty good. Since the high score is 50, it is not so good. Per the story:

 

Claiborne's score is the lowest known score by a draft prospect since Iowa State running back Darren Davis reportedly received a 4 in 2000. In 2006, quarterback Vince Young, who was the third overall pick by the Tennessee Titans, reportedly scored a 6 on his initial test before retaking it and getting a 16. Quarterback Dan Marino also scored a 16 and went on to a Hall of Fame career with the Miami Dolphins.

Claiborne's agent, Bus Cook, said he hadn't heard about Claiborne's test score.

"I haven't talked to anybody about it. All I know is that (Claiborne) was from a complicated defensive system and he flourished in it. I've never seen any sort of deficiency in him," Cook told ESPN NFL Insider Adam Schefter. "I'm sitting here in shock at what you're telling me. And if it is true, how does that get out?"

Cook, of course, you'll remember as the agent for Brett Favre. He also never seemed to offer much in the way of information when his client was/wasn't coming back to the Vikings.

By the way, this might not necessarily be a bad thing when it comes to Claiborne's on-field performance. The corner -- projected as a top-5 pick in this month's draft, in which the Vikings have the No. 3 pick -- could even benefit, per the last graf in the story:

A 2009 study by professors from Fresno State University, the University of Georgia and Towson State found no connection between Wonderlic scores and performance during the first three years of a player's NFL career. The group studied 762 players from the 2002, 2003 and 2004 draft classes. John W. Michel, an assistant professor at Towson University who co-authored the study, told the Washington Post: "We found in no cases was cognitive ability related to (football) performance. We did find a negative relationship for tight ends and defensive backs. For defensive backs, it was the most pronounced; basically, the lower you scored on the Wonderlic, the better you performed."