Want a piece of Prince’s fortune? It’s probably going to cost you.

The trust that’s been placed in charge of the estate for the late musician is asking that those laying claim to being related to the “Purple Rain” singer be made to pay for the testing to prove it.

In court documents filed in Minnesota, Bremer Trust, the special administrator of the estate, is asking a judge to lay down some guidelines for those “claiming to be heirs of the decedent.”

 

First, Bremer is asking a judge to order that claimants “must file an affidavit with the Court setting forth the facts that establish the reasonable possibility of the existence of such a relationship.”

After that, Bremer “shall develop a plan or protocol for testing after considering the positions of the parties claiming a genetic relationship.” And those parties should bring their checkbooks with them for the testing.

If the judge approves the request, Bremer, the special administrator of the Trust, “may require a party claiming a genetic relationship to the decedent to submit to and pay for blood and genetic tests in order to determine if a genetic relationship exists.”

 

As previously reported, Bremer secured a sample of the singer’s blood from the Midwest Medical Examiner for genetic testing.

Prince died April 21 at age 57, days after reportedly being treated for an overdose of the opioid painkiller Percocet. He was found unresponsive in the elevator of his Paisley Park home in Minnesota.

According to court documents filed by his sister Tyka Nelson, Prince died without a will.

 

However, writer Ian Halperin, who is collaborating on a documentary about the final hours of the singer’s life, told TheWrap that the people he’s spoken to insist that the musician left a will, and that it may be in Canada.

Pamela Chelin contributed to this report.

Read original story Prince Death Update: Possible Heirs May Have to Pay At TheWrap