Here's a list of what would be open and closed during a state government shutdown if Gov. Mark Dayton's plan is implemented.

A district court will hear his request on Thursday, and could amend Dayton's plan.

Also, some Republican state senators have asked the state Supreme Court to prevent the lower court from becoming involved in deciding what services would continue to function, so this list could remain in flux until a shutdown actually happens.

COURTS

Would remain open.

LICENSE PLATES

The state Driver and Vehicle Services division would be closed, but deputy registrars (mainly city and county offices)would be able to renew license plates.

DRIVER'S LICENSES

People will be able to renew licenses at Driver’s License agent offices (mainly city and county offices.) Driver tests would not be available.

EDUCATION

State funding to K-12 schools would stop. School districts would have to tap reserves or borrow funds to keep summer school and extended-time programs going past June 30. Crunch time would come on July 15, when schools are scheduled to receive $295 million in state funds. Superintendents have been asked to make contingency plans. Federal funds would not be distributed, teacher license renewals would not be processed and preparation for reporting statewide test assessments would cease. State services for the blind would close. More info.

HEALTH

Health Department staff could respond to a disease outbreak, operate the Poison Control Center, do limited food inspections. The department would stop annual inspections of hospitals, nursing homes and other health facilities but would investigate complaints of improper care. Dayton's original filing did not include payments to health care providers to provide services to low-income people. But he said he was revising his recommendation to include payments the ensure those services, such as MinnesotaCare and Medicaid, would continue. More info.

HUMAN SERVICES

People receiving food stamps or welfare benefits would continue to receive them. Initially, Dayton said no new clients would be enrolled in those programs. A revised plan would allow newly eligible people to enroll. More info.

HIGHWAY REST STOPS

Would close.

HUNTING, FISHING LICENSES

Would not be issued. But DNR officers would continue enforcement.

MILITARY

The Department of Veterans Affairs would keep veterans homes open, along with critical assistance programs and the state Veterans Cemetery. Tuition reimbursement claims would stop and veterans' outreach claims offices would close. Camp Ripley would keep support staff for scheduled military training. Guard members training for deployments are on federal active-duty status and would not be affected.

MINNESOTA STATE COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES

Would remain open.

MINNESOTA STATE LOTTERY

Would close.

POLLUTION CONTROL AGENCY

Would respond to environmental emergencies, maintain safety and health-related equipment at certain closed landfills and other cleanup sites, and would notify citizens of an air quality alert. More info: www.pca.state.mn.us/index.php/about-mpca/mpca-general-information/frequently-asked-questions-about-a-potential-state-shutdown-for-mpca-customers.html?nav=1

PUBLIC SAFETY

State Patrol would stay on. State crime labs would stay open, as would emergency communications for Homeland Security. The state Capitol Complex would keep its security detail. The state's prison system would keep 3,600 of its 4,200 employees, including most of those who deal directly with offenders. Officials say they cannot disclose details for security reasons.

RACE TRACKS

Though the Minnesota Racing Commission is among the state agencies that could be closed in the event of a government shutdown, Canterbury Park officials are asking that the Shakopee track be allowed to continue operating because it pays for regulatory services in advance. Running Aces told employees they'd be laid off and the track closed.

STATE PARKS

Would close.

STILLWATER LIFT BRIDGE

Would close to vehicle traffic. It would be raised to allow boat traffic and would remain in the raised position.

TAXES

The Revenue Department would continue processing revenue deposits, but no refund checks would go out. Tax Court would be closed.

TRANSPORTATION

Most state-funded road construction projects would stop, except for emergency repairs. The Central Corridor light-rail line construction would continue, because its funding has already been appropriated or comes from other sources. The Metropolitan Council could use its reserves to keep buses and rail lines operating for at least a month. The Minnesota Valley Transit Authority, which operates many south-metro bus lines, plans to keep buses rolling with reserve funds for up to 60 days. Highway rest stops would close.

UNEMPLOYMENT BENEFITS

Unclear if they would be paid; in the 2005 shutdown the courts directed payments to continue.

UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA

Plans to use reserves and incoming tuition money to remain open.

MORE RESOURCES

Here are resources to track the latest developments on what would be open or closed:

-- Staff writers Warren Wolfe, Rachel E. Stassen-Berger, Eric Roper, Pat Doyle, Mark Brunswick, Norm Draper, Jean Hopfensperger and Katie Humpheys contributed to this report.