FICTION

1. The President Is Missing, by Bill Clinton and James Patterson. (Little, Brown and Knopf) President Jonathan Duncan takes on adversaries at home and abroad.

2. The Good Fight, by Danielle Steel. (Delacorte) Meredith McKenzie embraces and eschews the values of her family of lawyers during the tumultuous 1960s.

3. Clock Dance, by Anne Tyler. (Knopf) A window into Willa Drake’s life over 50 years and how she adjusts to some of life’s surprises.

4. The Outsider, by Stephen King. (Scribner) A detective investigates a seemingly wholesome member of the community when an 11-year-old boy’s body is found.

5. All We Ever Wanted, by Emily Giffin. (Ballantine) A scandal sends members of two Nashville families into chaos.

6. The Perfect Couple, by Elin Hilderbrand. (Little, Brown) A body is found in Nantucket Harbor hours before a picture-perfect wedding.

7. The Summer Wives, by Beatriz Williams. (Morrow) In the 1950s, a high-society schoolgirl falls for the son of a lighthouse keeper and, years later, tries to help undo his wrongful imprisonment.

8. Spinning Silver, by Naomi Novik. (Del Rey) Miryem goes to collect debts owed to her father and winds up on a dangerous quest.

9. Spymaster, by Brad Thor. (Emily Bestler/Atria) The 18th book in the Scot Harvath series.

10. When Life Gives You Lululemons, by Lauren Weisberger. (Simon & Schuster) Emily Charlton plans a comeback from the suburbs.

NONFICTION

1. Calypso, by David Sedaris. (Little, Brown) A collection of comedic stories on mortality, middle age and a beach house dubbed the Sea Section.

2. Educated, by Tara Westover. (Random House) The daughter of survivalists leaves home for university.

3. The Soul of America, by Jon Meacham. (Random House) The present political climate is contextualized through the lens of difficult moments in American history.

4. How to Change Your Mind, by Michael Pollan. (Penguin Press) A personal account of how psychedelics might help the mentally ill and people dealing with everyday challenges.

5. Indianapolis, by Lynn Vincent and Sara Vladic. (Simon & Schuster) A newly researched look into the sinking of the USS Indianapolis, the story of the survivors and the fight to exonerate the court-martialed skipper. (x)

6. Astrophysics for People in a Hurry, by Neil deGrasse Tyson. (Norton) A straightforward, easy-to-understand introduction to the universe.

7. Bad Blood, by John Carreyrou. (Knopf) The rise and fall of the biotech startup Theranos. (x)

8. The Plot to Destroy Democracy, by Malcolm Nance. (Hachette) The former U.S. intelligence officer describes the tools and techniques used by Vladimir Putin to affect the 2016 election.

9. Barracoon, by Zora Neale Hurston. (Amistad) A previously unpublished, first-person account of a man who was enslaved 50 years after the slave trade was banned.

10. I’ll Be Gone In The Dark, by Michelle McNamara. (Harper) A search for “the Golden State Killer.”

Advice, How-To, Miscellaneous

1. Girl, Wash Your Face, by Rachel Hollis. (Thomas Nelson) (b)

2. The Plant Paradox, by Steven R. Gundry. (Harper Wave/HarperCollins)

3. The Subtle Art of Not Giving a ----, by Mark Manson. (HarperOne/HarperCollins) (b)

4. Magnolia Table, by Joanna Gaines with Marah Stets. (Morrow)

5. You Are a Badass, by Jen Sincero. (Running Press)

 

Rankings reflect sales at venues nationwide for the week ending July 14. An (x) indicates that a book’s sales are barely distinguishable from those of the book above. A (b) indicates that some sellers report receiving bulk orders.