FICTION

1. The Great Alone, by Kristin Hannah. (St. Martin’s) A former prisoner of war returns from Vietnam and moves his family to Alaska, where they face tough conditions.

2. Fifty Fifty, by James Patterson and Candice Fox. (Little, Brown) Detective Harriet Blue tries to clear her brother’s name and save a small Australian town from being massacred.

3. The Woman in the Window, by A.J. Finn. (Morrow) A recluse who drinks heavily and takes prescription drugs may have witnessed a crime across from her Harlem townhouse.

4. An American Marriage, by Tayari Jones. (Algonquin) A newlywed couple’s relationship is tested when the husband is sentenced to 12 years in prison.

5. Little Fires Everywhere, by Celeste Ng. (Penguin Press) An artist upends a quiet town outside Cleveland.

6. Raspberry Danish Murder, by Joanne Fluke. (Kensington) After her husband disappears, Hannah Swensen Barton searches for a killer while trying to fulfill holiday baking orders.

7. Before We Were Yours, by Lisa Wingate. (Ballantine) A South Carolina lawyer learns about the questionable practices of a Tennessee orphanage.

8. Still Me, by Jojo Moyes. (Pamela Dorman/Viking) Louisa Clark moves to New York and is torn between high society and the life she enjoys at a vintage clothing store.

9. The Hush, by John Hart. (St. Martin’s) Johnny Merrimon fights to keep the 6,000 acres of once-sacred land in North Carolina he inherited.

10. Origin, by Dan Brown. (Doubleday) A symbology professor goes on a perilous quest with a beautiful museum director.

NONFICTION

1. Fire and Fury, by Michael Wolff. (Holt) A journalist offers an inside account of the first year of the Trump White House.

2. I’ll Be Gone in the Dark, by Michelle McNamara. (Harper) The late true-crime journalist’s search for the serial murderer and rapist known as “the Golden State Killer.”

3. Skin in the Game, by Nassim Nicholas Taleb. (Random House) The engineering professor argues that a willingness to accept one’s own risks is an important part of success.

4. Educated, by Tara Westover. (Random House) The daughter of survivalists, who is kept out of school, educates herself enough to leave home for university.

5. Obama, by Pete Souza. (Little, Brown) More than 300 pictures of the former president by his White House photographer, with behind-the-scenes stories.

6. Enlightenment Now, by Steven Pinker. (Viking) A case for using reason, science and humanism to counter pessimistic views of Western civilization.

7. Astrophysics for People in a Hurry, by Neil deGrasse Tyson. (Norton) A straightforward, easy-to-understand introduction to the universe.

8. Killers of the Flower Moon, by David Grann. (Doubleday) The story of a murder spree in 1920s Oklahoma that targeted Osage Indians.

9. The Last Black Unicorn, by Tiffany Haddish. (Gallery) The comedian recounts growing up in South Central Los Angeles and finding success after a period of homelessness.

10. Born a Crime, by Trevor Noah. (Spiegel & Grau) A memoir about growing up biracial in apartheid South Africa by the host of “The Daily Show.”

11. Leonardo da Vinci, by Walter Isaacson. (Simon & Schuster) A biography of the Italian Renaissance polymath that connects his work in various disciplines. (x)

Advice, How-To, Miscellaneous

1. I’ve Been Thinking ..., by Maria Shriver. (Pamela Dorman/Viking)

2. Food, by Mark Hyman. (Little, Brown)

3. The Subtle Art of Not Giving a ----------, by Mark Manson. (HarperOne/HarperCollins) (b)

4. You Are a Badass, by Jen Sincero. (Running Press)

5. The Five Love Languages, by Gary Chapman. (Northfield)

 

Rankings reflect sales at venues nationwide for the week ending March 3. An (x) indicates that a book’s sales are barely distinguishable from those of the book above. A (b) indicates that some sellers report receiving bulk orders.