Mark Trehaus, left, has owned Treehouse Records since 2001 and helped musicians such as Paul Metzger issue their own albums via his label Nero's Neptune. / Star Tribune file

Treehouse Records owner Mark Trehus, left, has also helped musicians such as Paul Metzger issue their own albums via his label Nero's Neptune. / Star Tribune file

For 44 years, musicheads from across the Twin Cities have been flocking to the corner of 26th Street and Lyndale Avenue in Minneapolis to stock up on hard-to-find albums or find the next big thing -- a tradition that likely will end at the end of 2017 as the owner of Treehouse Records plans to shut down the store.

Mark Trehus announced his closing intentions Saturday during an in-store performance by the Suicide Commandos, who had fittingly promoted their previous record there way back in 1978 when the place was named Oar Folkjokeopus. During its tenure as Oar Folk, the store became a part of Replacements lore and a hub for local musicians and other indie/punk bands. Trehaus took over the shop and renamed it in 2001, going on to survive the lean years with a hip and eclectic stock before vinyl’s resurgence.

Talking via email on Sunday, Treehouse’s almost-namesake owner said his decision to shut down is more for personal reasons than business.

“Everything feels right and serendipitous about making this change at age 62,” said Trehus, avoiding specifics except to say his plan is “borne out of positive changes I want to pursue.”

He’s not getting out of the record-selling business altogether. He intends to continue peddling records online and at certain renowned record conventions “focusing on serious rarities, not common records,” he said, but firmly conceded, “I will not have a storefront presence in the Twin Cities after Dec. 31, 2017.” He also ruled out selling or leasing out the space to another record store, and instead said, “I am open to all [other] offers for future leases.”

The news was already in steady rotation on Facebook and Twitter yesterday with tweets like this by ex-Minneapolitan Craig Finn of the Hold Steady.

Look for a special closing party toward the end of the year at Treehouse, access for which will be given out to any shoppers who spend $25 or more in the coming months.

The good news: We can always remember the store via online video thanks to Fancy Ray's Super Bowl commercial for Taco Bell (posted below).

Tom Chevalier browsed the bins at Treehouse in 2008, when CDs were still a big part of its stock.

Tom Chevalier browsed the bins at Treehouse in 2008, when CDs were still a big part of its stock.

Taco Bell / #BiggerThan Fancy Ray from Andy Pearson on Vimeo.

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