Scene at the fair

Midway

Toss a ring, wing a baseball, pick a horse in the Kentucky Derby, take flight on the Hurricane, land back on Earth with bugs in your teeth. When fairgoers feel lucky, they stroll over to the Mighty Midway. 

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Austin Fern, center, of Minneapolis, basked in his last day of summer vacation before heading off to college in the fall.
Sam Greenstein got his picture taken by his sister Hilary at the Jukebox Music Video Funhouse. "I love the dated art," says Hilary.
"I like running into people," says Ernie Hebda, 57, who used to be a bartender. "Having a bad time is a total waste of time." His aim is true.
A few friends did a victory dance after winning three stuffed animals at the Kentucky Derby ball toss.
Greg Auer of Big Lake, left, and Trey Jonas of Maple Grove hit the jackpot by hitting a milk jug on the midway.
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Tossing a ring on a coke bottle is as hard as it looks. But people step right up and try it anyway.
Arlo Northrop-Kiel,10, of St. Paul raised his arms in triumph after winning a water gun race on the midway.
Rusty English, who is from a little town 100 miles south of Charleston, W.Va., has been on the fair circuit for 34 years. His days are long, 15 to 16 hours for the duration.
Franny Bray and John Webb of Edina looked over their loot from the Mighty Midway. "It's all in the technique," said Webb, who won most of the plush prizes. He said he watched others closely on skee ball and other games before playing.
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