Generally speaking, with moderate use, smartphones can give you a full day’s performance before needing to be recharged, but not all gadgets are created equal — some simply run out of steam early, whereas others will hang in there for the long haul. Here are four smartphones with battery life that really impressed us.

CNET.com

Motorola Droid Maxx

CNET rating: 4.5 stars out of 5 (Outstanding)

The good: The Motorola Droid Maxx delivers astonishingly long battery life, a big, colorful screen, and a durable, attractive design. The phone performs inventive tricks such as responding to voice commands, giving screen-based notifications and quick-launching the camera, which takes pleasing pictures.

The bad: The Motorola Droid Maxx is expensive.

The cost: $299.99 to $699.99

The bottom line: If you can get past its steep price, the massive-screened Motorola Droid Maxx is currently Verizon’s best Android smartphone.

For a full product review, go to http://reviews.cnet.com/motorola-droid-maxx/?part=newspapers

Samsung Galaxy S4

CNET rating: 4.5 stars out of 5 (Outstanding)

The good: The Samsung Galaxy S4 has Android 4.2.2, a fantastic camera, a powerful quad-core processor, and software solutions for just about every scenario — including working as a TV/DVR remote. It’s also comfortable in hand and has NFC, a user-replaceable battery and a microSD storage slot.

The bad: Its screen is dimmer than competitors’, its plastic design gives it a cheaper look than its rivals, and we found the Galaxy S4’s power button turned on at undesirable times. Not all camera modes work as promised, and a long list of software features can quickly overwhelm and confuse.

The cost: $99.99 to $494.99

The bottom line: Its laundry list of features require time and effort to truly master, but the Galaxy S4 is the top choice for anyone looking for a big-screen, do-everything smartphone.

For a full product review, go to http://reviews.cnet.com/samsung-galaxy-s4/?part=newspapers

Samsung Galaxy Note 3

CNET rating: 4 stars out of 5 (Excellent)

The good: The Samsung Galaxy Note 3 has a gorgeous and massive screen, a screaming quad-core processor and refined S Pen capabilities. It also has long battery life, makes clear calls and takes great pictures.

The bad: The Note 3 is expensive and large, and its faux-leather styling is crafted from cheap plastic.

The cost: $299.99 to $703.99.

The bottom line: While its plastic skin doesn’t do its high price justice, Samsung’s Galaxy Note 3 makes the most compelling argument yet for a supersize phone.

For a full product review, go to http://reviews.cnet.com/samsung- galaxy-note-3/?part=newspapers

Motorola Moto X

CNET rating: 4 stars out of 5 (Excellent)

The good: The Motorola Moto X squeezes a speedy camera and futuristic voice command capabilities into a well-crafted design that hits the sweet spot between screen size and comfort. The phone has great battery life and is available in an endless variety of customized designs.

The bad: With no expandable storage, space could get tight, especially on the 16GB base model. The screen isn’t as big and sharp as those on some competing handsets.

The cost: $199.95 to $699.99

The bottom line: While it lags behind rival superphones in screen quality and storage capacity, the Moto X’s superbly compact and comfortable design, whiz-bang voice controls and long battery life make it a worthy Android contender.

For a full product review, go to http://reviews.cnet.com/motorola- moto-x/?part=newspapers