TOP STORIES
  • Despite winning funding, Minneapolis crime-fighting teams never came together: Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey worked hard to persuade a divided City Council to sign off on a nearly $500,000 plan to bring in outside law enforcement officers to help Minneapolis police fight a crime wave. But after one department said it didn't have the manpower and contract negotiations with another dragged on, the Joint Enforcement Teams never formed, and the city didn't spend the money. Now, if the mayor wants to create the teams in 2021, he will need approval from City Council once again.
  • U.S. House set to impeach Trump for a second time: President Donald Trump is on the verge of being impeached for a second time in a fast-moving House vote, just a week after he encouraged loyalists to "fight like hell" against election results and then a mob of supporters stormed the U.S. Capitol. While Trump's first impeachment in 2019 brought no Republican votes in the House, a small but significant number of GOP leaders and lawmakers are breaking with the party to join Democrats, saying Trump violated his oath to protect and defend U.S. democracy. U.S. Rep. Ilhan Omar said in a brief House floor speech on Wednesday that Trump must be impeached and removed from office for "directly and specifically" inciting "a violent attempt to interrupt our democracy."
  • Violent threats targeting Minnesota leaders on the rise: Violent threats against Minnesota's political leaders are growing in frequency and intensity, a trend that started long before last week's storming of the U.S. Capitol cheered on by a crowd in St. Paul.
  • Minnesota tempers expectations for expanded vaccine rollout: State health officials warned Tuesday that a revised federal plan to prioritize initial COVID-19 vaccine for senior citizens could backfire if more doses don't accompany this massive expansion. More than 558,000 doses of COVID-19 vaccine have been earmarked for Minnesota, where health officials report continued progress in immunizing people against an infectious disease that has caused at least 5,774 deaths.
  • Walz extends COVID-19 state of emergency: Gov. Tim Walz on Wednesday won legislative approval to extend Minnesota's peacetime state of emergency by another 30 days so he can continue to use executive orders to direct the state's response to the coronavirus pandemic.
  • Parts of Twin Cities metro could see significant snow with year's first storm: The National Weather Service says there is a "high probability" that an area stretching from the metro's southern suburbs south to Albert Lea and Rochester will see 6 inches or more of snow as the first storm of 2021 takes aim at the state.
  • Minnesota settles lawsuit against Monticello cafe that violated COVID-19 restrictions: The state Attorney General's Office on Tuesday announced the settlement with the owner of the Cornerstone Cafe, which had defied Walz's order that closed bars and restaurants to in-person business through Jan. 10 by staying open.
  • St. Croix County, Wis., GOP website with "prepare for war" message goes down: The website of a local Republican Party office in Hudson, Wis., was down as of Wednesday morning, days after it drew widespread criticism for posting a message to "prepare for war." It wasn't immediately clear who pushed the site offline; the county party chairman was initially defiant and ignored a request earlier this week from the state GOP office that the message be removed.
  • St. Paul City Council considers reparations for slavery: The council will take up a resolution Wednesday that would form a commission to consider reparations. The document apologizes for a series of historic scars, from slavery at Fort Snelling — including the enslavement ofDred Scott— to the destruction of St. Paul's Rondo neighborhoodto make way for Interstate 94in the 1950s.
  • How is Mississippi River water made safe to drink? In the latest episode of the Curious Minnesota podcast, host Eric Roper paid a visit to Minneapolis' water treatment campus in Fridley to understand the complex process that makes river water safe to drink.

HEY, LOOK AT THIS

Inside the world's largest — and America's priciest — home: Behold The One — a record-breaking Los Angeles estate with 105,000 square feet of living space and, it seems, a nearly $350 million price tag, writes Karine Monié for Architectural Digest.

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TRENDING
  • Returning to the U.S. by air? You'll need a negative COVID test. Effective Jan. 26, anyone flying into the United States from another country will need to show proof they have tested negative for the coronavirus, following a new requirement set by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Tuesday.
  • Take a deep dive into 7 of the best films from Black filmmakers: They haven't gotten many chances, but Black filmmakers have created a lot of excellence.Here are seven greats worth getting your hands on.
  • Semisonic's Dan Wilson sells publishing for songs including Adele, Chicks hits: Semisonic frontman Dan Wilson — who has also co-written songs with Adele, the Chicks, Taylor Swift and other platinum-selling artists — followed the lead of Bob Dylan and cashed in on his song publishing during what seems to be a hot market for such deals.

SPORTS ROUNDUP

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WORTH A CLICK

Why scientists want to shorten the minute to 59 seconds: "We like to say nothing is certain in life but death and taxes, but the truth is even our planet and the universe are constantly imposing changes on us. That includes this new suggestion from scientists: We should considershortening the minuteto just 59 seconds, at least for one 'negative leap second' that will better line us up with Earth's real rotation," reports Caroline Delbert for Popular Mechanics.

FROM THE ARCHIVES

Jan. 13, 2019: Yajaira Fleming led a group of young dancers while Aiyana Machado led a workshop at St. Paul's Landmark Center on dancing the Bomba, a Puerto Rican dance that has roots in the resistance movement by slaves on the island. (Photo: Jeff Wheeler/Star Tribune)