Grilled Creamed Corn

Serves 4 to 6.

Note: Here, the corn is grilled first, which adds noticeable complexity to the flavor. You can grill the corn a day or two in advance. The creamed corn can be refrigerated for up to 5 days. From Jim Shahin.

• 2 tbsp. unsalted butter

• 3/4 c. chopped sweet onion

• 3/4 c. seeded, chopped green bell pepper

• 3/4 c. seeded, diced red bell pepper

• 3 or 4 ears “naked” grilled corn (see recipe)

• 2 tbsp. flour

• 1 1/2 c. light cream

• 1/2 tsp. kosher salt

• A few grindings of black pepper

Directions

Melt the butter in a large sauté pan over medium heat. Stir in the onion and bell peppers; cook for 5 to 7 minutes or just until softened, stirring a few times.

Scrape enough kernels from the ears to yield 3 cups. Transfer to a large bowl; discard the cobs or reserve them for making a corn broth later. Add the corn kernels to the pan, stirring to incorporate.

Whisk together the flour and light cream in a liquid measuring cup, then gradually pour the mixture into the pan, stirring to mix well. Cook for about 5 minutes, stirring occasionally; adjust the heat as needed so the mixture does not scorch. Season with salt and pepper. Serve warm.

Nutrition information per each of 6 servings:

Calories 300 Fat 23 g Sodium 130 mg

Carbohydrates 22 g Saturated fat 14 g Protein 5g

Cholesterol 75 mg Dietary fiber 3 g

 

 

 

Smoked Corn and Black Bean Salad

Serves 6 to 8 (makes a generous 6 cups).

Notes: Every main dish in the carnivore’s summer canon — hot dogs, burgers, barbecue — would benefit from being paired with this light, zingy and colorful side dish. Smoking the corn provides this versatile mainstay with a seasonal dimension. The salad needs to rest in the refrigerator for at least 1 hour, and preferably 1 day, to allow the flavors to mingle. It can be refrigerated for up to 1 week. From Jim Shahin.

• 3 or 4 ears smoked corn (see recipe)

• 1/3 c. diced sweet onion

• 1/2 c. seeded, diced green bell pepper

• 1/2 c. seeded, diced red bell pepper

• 1 tsp. minced, seeded and stemmed serrano pepper

• 1/2 tsp. minced garlic

• 16 oz. cooked or canned, no-salt-added black beans (if using canned, drain, rinse and dry on paper towels)

• 2 tbsp. coarsely chopped cilantro leaves

• 2 tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil

• 2 tbsp. fresh lime juice

• 1 tsp. kosher salt, or more as needed

• 3 or 4 grindings of black pepper, or more as needed

Directions

Scrape enough kernels from the ears to yield 3 cups. Transfer to a large bowl; discard the cobs or reserve for making a corn broth later. Add the onion, bell and serrano peppers, garlic, black beans, cilantro, oil, lime juice, salt and pepper to taste; toss gently to incorporate.

Cover and refrigerate for at least 1 hour (and up to 5 days). Taste and adjust seasoning as needed; serve chilled or at room temperature.

Nutrition information per each of 8 servings:

Calories 160 Fat 5 g Sodium 150 mg

Carbohydrates 26 g Saturated fat 1 g Protein 7 g Cholesterol 0 mg Dietary fiber 7 g

 

Grilled Corn Four Ways

Serves 4.

Note: Oak and apple woods work especially well because they are mild, but other hardwoods, such as pecan and cherry, are fine. For each of these four grilling methods, you’ll need to first soak the ears in water for 15 to 30 minutes. From Jim Shahin.

• 4 ears husk-on sweet corn

Directions

To grill the corn naked: Discard the husks and silk; soak the ears for 15 to 30 minutes.

Meanwhile, prepare a grill for direct heat. If using a gas grill, preheat to medium-high (450 degrees). If using a charcoal grill, light the charcoal or wood briquettes; when the briquettes are ready, distribute them under the cooking area for direct heat. For a medium-hot fire, you should be able to hold your hand about 6 inches above the coals for about 4 or 5 seconds. Have ready a spray water bottle for taming any flames. Lightly coat the grill rack with oil and place it on the grill.

Place the ears of corn on the grate. Cook uncovered, giving them a quarter-turn about every 2 minutes for a total of about 8 minutes. Remove once the kernels have just begun to blacken in spots.

To grill the corn husk-on: Pull back the husk of each ear and discard the silk, being careful to keep the husk largely intact. Pull the husks back over the ears and secure each at the top with a length of aluminum foil. Soak in water for 15 to 30 minutes.

Meanwhile, prepare a charcoal grill for direct heat. (This method is not suitable for a gas grill.) Light the charcoal or wood briquettes; when the briquettes are ready, distribute them evenly. For a medium-hot fire, you should be able to hold your hand about 6 inches above the coals for about 4 or 5 seconds. Have ready a spray water bottle for taming any flames.

Place the husk-covered corn directly on the embers. Use long-handled tongs to give them a quarter-turn about every 2 minutes, for a total of about 8 minutes. Once they’re just cool enough to handle, discard the husks.

To smoke the corn: Have ready 1/2 cup of hardwood chips; there’s no need to soak them.

Discard the husks and silk; soak the ears for 15 to 30 minutes. (You may also leave the husks on, which imparts a slightly less smoky but decidedly cornier flavor. Pull back the husks and discard the silks, being careful to keep the husks largely intact. Pull the husks back over the corn and secure at the top with a length of foil before you soak the ears.)

Meanwhile, prepare the grill for direct and indirect heat. If using a gas grill, turn the heat to high. Put the chips in a smoker box or foil packet poked with a few fork holes to release the smoke; set it between the grate and the briquettes, close to the flame. When you see smoke, reduce the heat to medium-high (450 degrees). Turn off the burners on one side.

If using a charcoal grill, light the charcoal or briquettes; when the briquettes are ready, distribute them on one side of the grill. For a medium-hot fire, you should be able to hold your hand 6 inches above the coals for 4 or 5 seconds. Scatter the (unsoaked) wood chips over the coals. Have ready a spray water bottle for taming any flames. Close the lid to reduce flames from the wood chips.

After about 3 minutes, place the corn on the hot side of the grill. Cook uncovered for 4 minutes, giving the ears a quarter-turn every so often to get a light browning. Use long-handled tongs to move the corn to the indirect-heat side of the grill. Close the lid and the top vents; let the corn smoke for 2 minutes.

To grill foil-wrapped corn: Discard the husks and silk; soak the ears for 15 to 30 minutes.

Meanwhile, prepare a grill for direct heat. If using a gas grill, preheat to medium-high (450 degrees). If using a charcoal grill, light the charcoal or wood briquettes; when the briquettes are ready, distribute them under the cooking area for direct heat. For a medium-hot fire, you should be able to hold your hand about 6 inches above the coals for about 4 or 5 seconds. Have ready a spray water bottle for taming any flames. Lightly coat the grill rack with oil and place it on the grill.

Wrap each ear in foil. Place on the grill. Cook the ears for 8 to 10 minutes, turning them frequently. You can tell the corn’s done by pulling back the foil a little; the kernels will be plump and will look almost steamed or boiled. (This method of cooking corn is forgiving; if you’re not sure the corn is done, it can go back on the grill for a total of up to 15 minutes.) Once the cobs are just cool enough to handle, discard the foil.

Nutrition information per serving:

Calories 120 Fat 2 g Sodium 20 mg Saturated fat 0 g

Carbohydrates 27 g Protein 5 g Cholesterol 0 mg Dietary fiber 4 g