The Star Tribune, MPR News and KARE 11 interviewed 800 Minneapolis registered voters between Aug. 10 and Aug. 12. That sample included interviews with 525 self-identified white registered voters and 146 African-American registered voters. An additional 354 interviews were conducted Aug. 6 to Aug. 12 with African-American registered voters in Minneapolis, for a total of 500 interviews. This is commonly referred to as an “oversample,” and allows for an apples-to-apples comparison of the responses of white voters and Black voters.

Findings from questions about Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey, the City Council, and potential changes to the police department are below. The margin of error for the sample of 800 Minneapolis registered voters is ± 3.5 percentage points. The margin of error for the sample of 500 African-American Minneapolis registered voters is no more than ± 4.5 percentage points. Totals may not add up to 100% due to rounding. Scroll down the page for details about how the poll was conducted and a demographic breakdown of the respondents.

Do you think Minneapolis should or should not redirect some funding from the police department to social services, such as mental health, drug treatment or violence prevention programs?

Should Should not Not sure: 3%
73% 24%  
  Should Should not Not sure
TOTAL 73% 24% 3%
Male 68% 28% 4%
Female 78 20 2
White 72 25 3
Black 76 19 5
Other 77 21 2
18-34 88 10 2
35-49 80 16 4
50-64 63 35 2
65+ 59 38 3
No college degree 71 25 4
College graduate 75 23 2
DFL/ Democrat 85 12 3
Republican 27 72 1
Independent/ other 63 35 2

Do you think Minneapolis should or should not reduce the size of its police force?

Should Should not Not sure
40% 44% 16%
  Should Should not Not sure
TOTAL 40% 44% 16%
Male 36% 47% 17%
Female 44 41 15
White 41 44 15
Black 35 50 15
Other 42 40 18
18-34 61 24 15
35-49 44 40 16
50-64 24 59 17
65+ 30 57 13
No college degree 39 43 18
College graduate 41 45 14
DFL/ Democrat 46 37 17
Republican 16 80 4
Independent/ other 37 47 16

In the last few years, do you feel crime in Minneapolis has increased, has been reduced or has stayed the same?

Increased Reduced: 5% Same Not sure: 2%
51%   42%  
  Increased Reduced Same Not sure
TOTAL 51% 5% 42% 2%
Male 50% 4% 44% 2%
Female 52 6 40 2
White 45 5 48 2
Black 66 2 31 1
Other 58 7 34 1
18-34 35 3 58 4
35-49 43 4 52 1
50-64 59 7 33 1
65+ 69 8 21 2
No college degree 54 7 38 1
College graduate 48 4 45 3
DFL/ Democrat 45 5 47 3
Republican 81 0 18 1
Independent/ other 52 8 38 2

If Minneapolis were to significantly reduce the size of its police force, what effect do you think it would have on public safety?

Positive effect Negative effect No significant effect Not sure
26% 48% 14% 12%
  Positive effect Negative effect No significant effect Not sure
TOTAL 26% 48% 14% 12%
Male 24% 52% 15% 9%
Female 27 44 14 15
White 26 50 11 13
Black 25 49 18 8
Other 27 40 23 10
18-34 40 25 21 14
35-49 29 42 18 11
50-64 13 65 13 9
65+ 19 64 3 14
No college degree 24 49 25 12
College graduate 27 48 14 11
DFL/ Democrat 30 39 17 14
Republican 4 85 6 5
Independent/ other 24 56 10 10

Do you have a favorable or unfavorable opinion of Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey?

Favorable Unfavorable No opinion
50% 27% 23%
  Favorable Unavorable No opinion
TOTAL 50% 27% 23%
Male 47% 30% 23%
Female 52 24 24
White 49 30 21
Black 60 13 27
Other 43 28 29
18-34 40 28 32
35-49 49 28 23
50-64 57 24 19
65+ 53 27 20
No college degree 48 27 25
College graduate 51 27 22
DFL/ Democrat 60 21 19
Republican 6 66 28
Independent/ other 42 25 33

Do you have a favorable or unfavorable opinion of the Minneapolis City Council?

Favorable Unfavorable No opinion
43% 33% 24%
  Favorable Unfavorable No opinion
TOTAL 43% 33% 24%
Male 43% 35% 22%
Female 42 32 26
White 40 38 22
Black 50 26 24
Other 45 21 34
18-34 54 20 26
35-49 46 28 16
50-64 37 41 22
65+ 32 48 20
No college degree 44 32 24
College graduate 41 34 25
DFL/ Democrat 53 24 23
Republican 10 67 23
Independent/ other 31 42 27

Who do you trust more to make decisions about the future of the Minneapolis Police Department?

Mayor Frey City Council Not sure
33% 42% 25%
  Mayor Frey City Council Not sure
TOTAL 33% 42% 25%
Male 36% 45% 19%
Female 30 40 30
White 32 43 25
Black 43 38 19
Other 25 45 30
18-34 18 66 16
35-49 24 49 27
50-64 52 29 19
65+ 39 22 39
No college degree 33 41 26
College graduate 33 44 23
DFL/ Democrat 30 48 22
Republican 39 25 36
Independent/ other 38 36 26

About the poll

The findings of this Star Tribune/MPR News/KARE 11 Minnesota Poll are based on live interviews conducted Aug. 10 to Aug. 12 with 800 Minneapolis registered voters. That sample included interviews with 525 self-identified white registered voters and 146 African-American registered voters. An additional 354 interviews were conducted Aug. 6 to Aug. 12 with African-American registered voters in Minneapolis, for a total of 500 interviews. This is commonly referred to as an “oversample,” and allows for an apples-to-apples comparison of the responses of white voters and Black voters. This poll was conducted for the Star Tribune, Minnesota Public Radio News and KARE 11 by Mason-Dixon Polling and Strategy Inc.
Those interviewed were randomly selected by computer from a phone-matched Minneapolis voter registration list that included both land line and cellphone numbers. For the sample of 800 Minneapolis registered voters, 29% of the interviews were conducted via land line and 71% via cellphone. For the sample of 500 African-American registered voters, 26% of the interviews were conducted via land line and 74% via cellphone.
The margin of sampling error for the sample of 800 Minneapolis registered voters, according to standards customarily used by statisticians, is no more than ± 3.5 percentage points. This means there is a 95 percent probability that the "true" figure would fall within that range if all voters were surveyed. The margin of sampling error for the sample of 500 African-American Minneapolis registered voters is no more than ± 4.5 percentage points. The margin of error is higher for any subgroup, such as a gender or age grouping.
Sampling error does not take into account other sources of variation inherent in public opinion surveys, such as nonresponse, question wording or context effects. In addition, news events may have affected opinions during the period the poll was taken.
The self-identified party affiliation of the respondents of the sample of 800 Minneapolis registered voters is 62% Democrats, 10% Republicans and 28% independents or other. The self-identified party affiliation of the respondents of the sample of 500 African-American Minneapolis registered voters is 63% Democrats, less than 1% Republicans and 37% independents or other.
The demographic profile of this poll of registered voters is an accurate reflection of their respective voter populations. This determination is based on more than 100 statewide polls conducted by Mason-Dixon in Minnesota over the past 32 years – a period that spans eight presidential election cycles that began in 1988.
Readers can e-mail questions to matt.delong@startribune.com.

Demographics

PARTY
DFL/ Democrat 495 (62%)
Republican 79 (10%)
Independent/ other 226 (28%)
AGE
18-34 195 (24%)
35-49 232 (29%)
50-64 206 (26%)
65+ 163 (20%)
Refused 4 (1%)
RACE
White/ Caucasian 525 (66%)
Black/ African American 146 (18%)
Hispanic/ Latino 58 (7%)
Asian/ Pacific Islander 42 (5%)
Other 22 (3%)
Refused 7 (1%)
GENDER ID
Male 387 (48%)
Female 411 (51%)
Other 2 (<1%)
EDUCATION
High school
or less
170 (21%)
Some college/
Vocational
178 (22%)
College graduate 274 (34%)
Graduate degree 171 (22%)
Refused 7 (1%)
INTERVIEW
Land line 231 (29%)
Cellphone 569 (71%)