FLINT, Mich. — Here are the former Michigan, state-appointed and local officials charged in the Flint water crisis, titles at the time, and charges, allegations and maximum penalties they face if convicted:

- Gov. Rick Snyder: Two misdemeanor counts of willful neglect of duty. Failed to inquire into the performance, condition and administration of the public offices and officers he appointed and supervised; neglected his duty to protect citizens against disaster by failing to declare a state of emergency and/or disaster when he knew of a threat in Flint. One year in jail and a $1,000 fine on each count.

- Health and Human Services Director Nick Lyon: Nine felony counts of involuntary manslaughter. Caused the deaths of John Snyder on June 30, 2015; Debra Kidd on August 2, 2015; Brian McHugh on July 5, 2015; Du Wayne Nelson on August 7, 2015; Nelda Hunt on July 22, 2015; Peter Derscha on Aug. 17, 2015; Thomas Mulcahy on Aug. 22, 2015; Arthur Percy on Aug. 31, 2015; and Patricia Schaffer on July 23, 2015 by grossly negligent failure to protect the health of the citizens or by the negligent performance of that duty. Fifteen years in prison and a $7,500 fine on each count.

One misdemeanor count of willful neglect of duty. Neglected his duty to protect the health of citizens. One year and a $1,000 fine.

- Chief Medical Executive Eden Wells: Nine felony counts involuntary manslaughter. Caused the deaths of John Snyder on June 30, 2015; Debra Kidd on Aug. 2, 2015; Brian McHugh on July 5, 2015; Du Wayne Nelson on Aug. 7, 2015; Nelda Hunt on July 22, 2015; Peter Derscha on Aug. 17, 2015; Thomas Mulcahy on Aug. 22, 2015; Arthur Percy on Aug. 31, 2015; and Patricia Schaffer on July 23, 2015 by negligent failure to protect the health of citizens or by the negligent performance of that duty. Fifteen years and a $7,500 fine on each count.

Two felony counts of misconduct in office. Prevented and/or attempted to prevent the distribution of public health information about Legionnaires' disease to impacted communities; prevented and/or attempted to prevent state-appointed public health professionals from sharing information with the public and other public health officials about the Legionnaires' outbreak in Genesee County. Five years and $10,000 fine on each count.

- Transformation manager Rich Baird: Felony perjury. Made a false statement or statements under oath during investigative subpoena testimony conducted on March 1, 2017. Fifteen years.

Felony misconduct in office. Improperly used state personnel and resources. Five years and a $10,000 fine.

Felony obstruction of justice. Attempted to influence or interfere with ongoing legal proceedings arising from the Flint water crisis. Five years and a $10,000 fine.

Felony extortion. Communicated a threat to cause harm to the reputation or employment of a leader of the state-appointed Flint Area Community Health and Environmental Partnership with the intent to coerce him to act against his will during its investigation into the source of the Legionnaires' outbreak in Genesee County. Twenty years and a $10,000 fine.

- Jarrod Agen, chief of staff to Gov. Snyder: Felony perjury. Made a false statement or statements under oath during an investigative subpoena interview testimony conducted on Feb. 11, 2017. Fifteen years.

- State-appointed emergency manager Darnell Earley: Three felony counts of misconduct in office. Twice disseminated misleading information about Flint's drinking water while refusing to switch Flint's source back to the Detroit Water and Sewerage Department, when he had knowledge of quality issues and health risks associated with Flint's water; allowed Flint to incur debt in violation of the Home Rule City Act. Five years and a $10,000 fine on each count.

- State-appointed emergency manager Gerald Ambrose: Four counts of misconduct in office. From January 2015 to April 2015 rejected opportunities to switch Flint's drinking water source back to Detroit when he knew of quality issues and health risks associated with the drinking water as well as local opposition to continued use of the Flint River. Directed a consulting company hired by the city in early 2015 to address water quality and safety concerns to not evaluate or consider switching back to Detroit's water when he had knowledge of quality issues and health risks associated with Flint's water as well as local opposition to use of the Flint River. Just before his resignation as emergency manager in April 2015, when he knew of quality issues and health risks with Flint's water as well as local opposition to use of the Flint River, committed the city to a $7 million emergency loan to address its ongoing deficit that impeded Flint's ability to switch back to Detroit for its drinking water. Allowed Flint to incur debt in violation of the Home Rule City Act. Five years and a $10,000 fine on each count.

- Flint Director of Public Works Howard Croft: Two misdemeanor counts of willful neglect of duty. Neglected to communicate information or risks of health effects associated with Flint's water. Neglected to pursue or communicate corrosion concerns in the Flint water system. One year and a $1,000 fine each count.

- Nancy Peeler, early childhood health section manager in the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services. Two felony counts of misconduct in office. Concealed results of an analysis of elevated blood lead levels of children in Flint; misrepresented information about elevated blood lead levels of Flint children. Five years and a $10,000 fine on each count.

Misdemeanor willful neglect of duty. Failed to act upon indications of elevated blood lead levels of Flint children. Five years and a $10,000 fine.