INSIGNIA CLASS ROKU TV

$229.99

Smart TV delivers in simplicity

Netflix has developed a set of criteria to recommend smart TVs. The Insignia 32-inch Class Roku TV is a good choice, especially for cord cutters.

The main screen of the TV is icon-based, with an icon for each input (HDMI, game console, Blu-ray player) plus icons for each app you'd like to use, such as Netflix, Sling TV, Hulu Plus, Pandora, HBO Go and so on.

Out of the box, the set scans for available Wi-Fi networks. Once you join it to your network, it starts a guided setup for the smart features.

The Roku operating system and channel system will be familiar if you've ever used a Roku streaming box. But if you are a new user, the TV does a good job of taking you through the setup of channels and services you'd like to watch.

There is a fair amount of signing up for accounts and filling in of login names and passwords to get signed into everything, but once you do, watching streaming content on the Insignia TV is dead simple.

If there's a downside, it's the remote, which is more of a Roku remote than one included with a TV. If you have satellite or cable TV, you'll need to use the remote for that as well. When the TV is off (sleeping), one press of the Netflix button wakes up the TV and launches Netflix in less than three seconds.

DALLAS MORNING NEWS

MOTO 360

Start at $149.99

Ask and you shall receive (within reason)

The Android Wear Moto 360 smartwatch has a fat, round face that felt as weighty as an antique pocket watch. However, the oversize color touch-screen face makes for easier reading.

You talk to this smartwatch by saying "OK, Google" and then making a request. When asked to send an e-mail, it instantly asked "To whom?" When asked for directions to the nearest gas station, it brought up choices from Mobil and Exxon. You can load a travel app such as Orbitz, but tap the icon and you'll be directed to your phone to fully use it.

Good navigation and effective voice-activated search from a watch. The only issue is that the travel apps are pared down. You are better off using most of them on your phone.

NEW YORK TIMES