VARIDESK PRO PLUS 36

$350

Stand while you work with adjustable desk

The Varidesk is a height-adjustable desk that sits on top of your regular desk. The 36 stands for its width in inches. There are Pro Plus models from 30 inches up to 48 inches wide.

A first plus is that the desk comes fully assembled. It has two levels: an upper platform for your monitor and a lower one for keyboard and mouse. The two levels are well-proportioned (4 inches apart), which is good, since they are not adjustable in relationship to each other.

The entire two-level work surface rises and lowers to allow you to sit or stand as desired.

Getting the monitor and computer set up correctly is key. Because the surface rises and lowers up to 14 inches, you have to make sure you have enough slack in the various cords and cables.

When it's time to stand, you grab a lever on either side of the top level, and springs assist in the height adjustment. There are multiple height stops on the way up and down.

The upper surface of the Pro Plus 36 can support up to 35 pounds, which is more than enough to hold multiple flat-screen monitors plus a few peripherals.

It also takes up lots of space, though. It is 29.75 inches deep.

There are standing desks that don't take up as much space. If you have limited space, do some research for different models. There are a surprising number of different types of height-adjustable desks.

DALLAS MORNING NEWS

BRAVOLOL

Free for basic categories

Translation app handy for travelers

The Bravolol app brand puts basic phrases and vocabulary — "Thank you," "How much?" "A table for two, please" — at your fingertips. Each (in my case) English phrase is shown in the foreign language and sometimes as a transliteration, too.

Even better: Tap a phrase, and the app speaks it aloud so you know how to pronounce it.

There are a variety of languages available, including French, Spanish, Chinese, Vietnamese, Portuguese, Russian and Arabic. While free for basic categories, it's $4.99 for additional categories such as "driving" and "sightseeing."

NEW YORK TIMES