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Eagan is moving to restore water quality and clarity in four of its lakes that need it the most: LeMay, Carlson, Fitz and Holz. The problem is too much phosphorus, which can cause algae blooms and plant growth, making it unpleasant to swim and fish.

The fix is multipronged, lengthy and expensive. The Eagan City Council included $922,500 in its 2016 budget — part of $12.6 million the city plans to spend through 2020.

The plan is to reduce the amount and the impact of stormwater that drains into lakes by enlarging storm ponds; reducing runoff from residential and business properties; working with businesses on drainable hard surfaces and construction of rain gardens; and introducing alum to the lakes.