After eight months of living in the spotlight as college football's latest rock star, Jim Harbaugh is ready to move past the hype and get gritty on the football field.

Michigan travels to Utah on Thursday night for their season opener, a game that has to some degree, been overshadowed by the hype surrounding Harbaugh's return to the college ranks. Not that all the interesting stuff will be on the sideline.

Both teams opened fall camp with questions about their quarterbacks and only one has given fans a definitive answer.

Harbaugh refused to publicly name a starter, but says the players know who it is. Junior Shane Morris is the lone QB to return to Michigan's roster with starting experience — two games. Senior Jake Rudock transferred from Iowa with 25 starts under his belt. He passed for 2,436 yards and 16 touchdowns with five interceptions in 2014.

"I want both of them going into this game with the mind-set that they're one play away or they're starting," Harbaugh said. "It's the mind-set I always want our quarterback and backup quarterback going into the game with.

"If [keeping Utah in the dark] is a byproduct of it, we'll take that as well."

Utah coach Kyle Whittingham had a different issue. Senior Travis Wilson is a four-year starter who has struggled with consistency throughout his career. He lost the job twice in 2014, but still had an edge on senior Kendal Thompson, who replaced Wilson last season before suffering a season-ending knee injury.

Whittingham said the job was Wilson's to lose at the beginning of camp and there was never an indication that he was losing it. The Utes made it official Monday.

Etc.

•A woman who says she was raped while attending Oregon State in 1999 seeks $7.5 million in a federal Title IX lawsuit against the school and its former football coach, Mike Riley.

The woman accuses the university and Riley of failing to address a sexually violent culture among the football team that contributed to her being attacked by a player's cousin at an off-campus apartment.

Dennis Erickson had been Oregon State's football coach for 10 months at the time of the alleged rape, but his name does not appear in the suit filed Monday in Eugene, Ore. Riley led the team in 1998, when a different woman said she was raped by four men, one of whom was the player whose cousin is named as the attacker in the lawsuit.

Riley, now the coach at Nebraska, said in a statement that he was not aware of the 1999 incident until this week and could not comment on the lawsuit.