Jackie Collins, the bestselling British-born author known for her vibrant novels about the extravagance and glamour of life in Hollywood, died Saturday in Los Angeles. She was 77.

The cause was breast cancer, her family said in a statement.

"It is with tremendous sadness that we announce the death of our beautiful, dynamic and one of a kind mother, Jackie Collins, who died of breast cancer today," the Collins family said. "She was a true inspiration, a trailblazer for women in fiction and a creative force. She will live on through her characters but we already miss her beyond words."

Collins wrote more than 30 books, many of them filled with explicit, unrestrained sexuality, and sold more than 500 million copies worldwide. Her first novel, "The World Is Full of Married Men," was published in 1968. Australia and South Africa banned it because of its frank depiction of extramarital sex.

Collins, the younger sister of actress Joan Collins, wrote her books in longhand on either white printer paper or yellow legal pads, regularly churning out prodigious numbers of pages. Many were turned into movies and television miniseries.

In an interview with the New York Times Magazine that coincided with the publication of her 25th book, "Drop Dead Beautiful," Collins said she did not care what reviewers would say about it.

"I never pretended to be a literary writer," she said. "I'm a school dropout."

Jacqueline Jill "Jackie" Collins was born Oct. 4, 1937, in London. Survivors include her three daughters, Tracy, Tiffany and Rory, and her sister.

New York Times