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Snowiest October on Record. More Snow Sunday

Winter-Like Sunsets
 
Cloudy skies, a snowy landscape and a low sun angle made for a very winter-like sunset on Friday. Thanks to Aaron Weidner for capturing the the image below. 
 
(Image credit: Aaron Weidner)

 
Snowiest October on Record in the Twin Cities, St. Cloud and Eau Claire, WI
 
If you can believe it, we've had almost 9" of snow at the MSP Aiport this season, which makes it the snowiest October on record. This beats the old record of 8.2" set in 1991. Interestingly, both St. Cloud and Eau Claire, WI has also had record snowfall this month and are sitting at 7.2" so far this month.
 

More Snow PM Saturday - Sunday
 
Here's a look at our Sunday system, which brushes southern Minnesota with snow and light accumulations. It doesn't look like the metro we'll pick up much in the metro as most of the accumulations will fall farther south.
 

Snowfall Potential

Both the American (GFS) and European (ECMWF) weather models suggest light snow accumulations across the southern part of the state with light amounts possible even in the metro. Stay tuned for further updates. 


Fall Color Update

Welp - I hope you enjoyed the fall colors this year. It always goes fast, but this year seemed to go even faster.
 

Saturday Weather Outlook for Minneapolis

Keep in mind that the record low maximum temperature in the Twin Cities on Saturday is 33F set in 1887. With the high forecast to be below that, we will likely set a new record for the coldest high temperature ever recorded in the Twin Cities for October 24th. 
 

Saturday Meteograms for Minneapolis

Here's the forecast for Saturday, which shows exceptionally cold weather in place for this time of the year. In fact, we'll likely stay below freezing on Saturday, which will be record levels of cold for us at this time of the year. 


Saturday Weather Outlook

Take a look at the images below. All the numbers circled are forecast record cold high temps for the days. Note that these temps will be nearly -25F below average for the end of October.


Extended Temperature Outlook For Minneapolis

What the? The extended forecast looks more like December. Temps will continue to run nearly -20F below average and near record old lows. I hope this isn't a harbinger of times to come this winter.


Extended Temperature Outlook For Minneapolis

The extended outlook through the end of October shows some pretty chilly temps, but there may be some modest warming by Halloween and into early November. Stay tuned.


 
Average First Measurable Snow at MSP
 
In case you were wondering, the average first measurable snow (0.1") in the Twin Cities Metro is right around the first week of November. In the last 30 years, the earliest we've seen measurable snow was on October 10th back in 2009. The latest 1st measurable snow of the season happened on November 11th back in 2004.

Average First 1" Snowfall at MSP

The first 1" of snow typically happens around the 3rd or 4th week is November. The lastest first 1" of snow didn't fall in the metro until January 1st, back in 2005!


Drought Update

According to the US Drought Monitor, drought conditions are about the same as they were last week. 
 

 
8-14 Day Precipitation Outlook
 
According to NOAA's Climate Prediction Center, much of the nation should be fairly dry by early November.

8-14 Day Tempearture Outlook
 
According to NOAA's Climate Prediction Center, shows warmer than average temps across the western half of the country.
_______________________________________________________________________

Snowiest October on Record. More Snow Sunday
By Todd Nelson, filling in for Douglas.

BREAKING NEWS: 8.9 inches of snow has fallen at the MSP Airport this month, making it the snowiest October in recorded history!

Incredibly, we eclipsed the previous record of 8.2 inches that fell during the historic Halloween Blizzard of 1991. Keep in mind that much of the snow from that famed storm fell the following day, when 18.5 inches was recorded on November 1st. Unreal!

Believe it or not, more accumulating snow is in the forecast on Sunday with the heaviest tallies likely falling across southern Minnesota. By the way, St. Cloud and Eau Claire, WI have also had a record amount of snow this month, 7.2 inches!

This December-like weather continues through early next week with record cold temps likely. Highs will struggle to warm above the freezing mark over the next several days with lows dipping into the single digits on Tuesday morning, a week before the November 3rd Election Day.

Looking ahead, a modest warmup appears to be developing just in time for Trick-or-Treaters. Thankfully, too warm for any Halloween Blizzards!


Extended Forecast

SATURDAY: Cloudy and cold. Winds: NNE 5. High: 30.

SATURDAY NIGHT: Light snow develops. Winds: N 5. Low: 24.

SUNDAY: More snow. Light accumulations southern MN. Winds: N 5-10. High: 32.

MONDAY: Icy sunshine. Record cold temps. Winds: WSW 5-10. Wake-up: 17. High: 27.

TUESDAY: December-like. Average high: 53F. Winds: SW 7-12. Wake-up: 13. High: 30.

WEDNESDAY: Light rain/snow mix possible. Winds: WNW 5-10. Wake-up: 24. High: 38.

THURSDAY: A few flakes or flurries. Winds: NW 5-10. Wake-up: 27. High: 37.

FRIDAY: Mix of clouds and sun. Not as chilly. Winds: SSE 5-10. Wake-up: 31. High: 42.


This Day in Weather History
October 24th

1922: A powerful low pressure system over Minnesota brings 55 mph winds to Collegeville.


Average High/Low for Minneapolis
October 24th

Average High: 54F (Record: 80F set in 1989)
Average Low: 37F (Record: 15F set in 1887)

Record Rainfall: 1.00" set in 1899
Record Snowfall: 0.9" set in 1981


Sunrise/Sunset Times for Minneapolis
October 24th

Sunrise: 7:41:am
Sunset: 6:12:pm

Hours of Daylight: ~10 hours & 31 minutes

Daylight LOST since yesterday: ~ 2 minutes & 55 seconds
Daylight LOST since Summer Solstice (June 20th): ~ 5 hour & 6 minutes


Moon Phase for October 24th at Midnight
1.7 Days Since First Quarter Moon


What's in the Night Sky?

"These next several evenings – October 21, 22 and 23, 2020 – watch for the waxing moon to sweep by the gas giant planets, Jupiter and Saturn. Jupiter, which is the brighter of the two, beams some 13 times brighter than Saturn and brighter than all the stars. The only starlike object to outshine it in the evening sky right now is the red planet Mars, which you’ll find to the east of Jupiter and Saturn, low in the eastern sky at evening dusk and nightfall. The moon will pass Mars, too, later this month. Plus Saturn and Jupiter are very noticeable for their nearness to each other in 2020. They’re gearing up for their great conjunction before this year ends. It’ll be the closest Jupiter-Saturn conjunction in 397 years! Jupiter-Saturn conjunctions happen every 20 years. The last one took place on May 28, 2000. The next one after 2020 will come on October 31, 2040. Why are Jupiter and Mars so bright now? Jupiter is always bright by virtue of its large size; it’s the biggest planet in our solar system. Mars is tiny, smaller than Earth, but it’s bright now because Earth passed between Mars and the sun on October 13. Saturn, the sixth planet outward from the sun, is respectably bright but fainter than either Jupiter or Mars. It’s the farthest world that you can easily see with the unaided eye. The farther away that a planet resides from the sun, the more slowly it travels and the longer its orbit. Mars takes 687 Earth-days to travel around the sun once. Jupiter takes about 12 Earth-years to orbit once. Saturn takes nearly 30 Earth-years to orbit the sun."

See more from Earth Sky HERE:

(Image Credit: EarthSky.org)


 
National High Temps Saturday
 
High temps across the northern tier of the nation will be running much colder than average and in fact, many locations will be near record cold low high temps.

National Forecast Map For Saturday

Areas of showers and storms will continue across the Southeastern U.S., while a fairly potent storm will slide south along the Rockies and dump heavy snowfall amounts there.


National Weather Outlook

Here's the national weather outlook into the weekend, which shows a fairly decent winter storm unfolding across Rockies and High Plains. Hopefully this snowfall will help to put an end to the major wildfire concern across northern Colorado.


Delta Rains Move Northeast; Heavy Precipitation in the Northwest.

Here's the 7-day preciptation outlook across the nation, which shows heavy precipitation potential from the Southern US to the Mid-Atlantic States. Interestingly, there even appears to be some rainfall across the Southwestern US.


National Snowfall Potential

The national snow forecast over the next several days shows snow potential as far south as Texas as our next potent storm moves through the region through early next week. 


Ongoing Wildfires in the Western US

"Critical fire weather remains in effect across much of Northern California, with firefighters on high alert for the possibility of new fast moving wildfires. Over 5,500 firefighters contain to work towards full containment on 19 wildfires in California, 12 of which remain major incidents. Yesterday, firefighters responded to 24 new initial attack wildfires across the State, and despite Red Flag Warning conditions in Northern California all of the new fires were contained. Several Red Flag Warnings issued by the National Weather Service remain in effect across Northern California due to critical fire weather. Strong winds are likely to continue through this evening across portions of interior northern California stretching from Redding down to Vacaville, as well as through the parts of the Bay Area, the Sierra Foothills, and Northwest California. These areas could experience wind gusts of up to 45mph. Learn more about these warnings in this short video: https://youtu.be/ImAGkPaiPM8. Firefighters are monitoring weather conditions very closely as a stronger wind event if forecast starting Sunday and lasting through Tuesday. The National Weather Service has issued a Fire Weather Watch for much of Northern California due to these strong winds and low humidity. This event could bring the strongest winds seen this year, with peak wind gusts 40-50mph and up to 70+ mph in some canyons and ridgetops."

See more from Cal Fire HERE:


Tropical Update

The tropics aren't dead yet. According to NOAA's NHC, hurricane Epsilon will move quickly into the northcentral Atlantic this weekend, while an area of disturbed weather in the Western Caribbean has a high probability of tropical formation within the next 2 days. Stay tuned.


Tracking Epsilon

Bye Bye Epsilon... 


No More Regular Alphabet Names

It has been an active season so far as we've used up all 21 names that NOAA's NHC set for the year. Interestingly, Tropical Storm Arthur developed back in mid May, more than 4 months ago! Since then, we've had a total of 9 huricanes!


We're Into the Greek Alphabet - First Time Since 2005

Not only did we use up all 21 names in the list above, but we've entered the Greek Alphabet, which is only the 2nd time in recorded history that we've done that and the first time since 2005. Delta became the 25th named storm and the 9th hurricane of the 2020 Atlantic Hurricane Season.


Climate Stories

(Image Credit: NOAA)

"Solar Cycle 25 has begun, say solar astronomers"

"Our Sun goes through a roughly 11-year cycle of activity, peaking and troughing. Now, say solar scientists, Solar Cycle 25 has officially begun. Solar Cycle 25 has officially begun. After a year and a half with barely any sunspots, a group of astronomers, known as the Solar Cycle 25 Prediction Panel, have announced the Sun’s activity has been climbing since December 2019, marking the beginning of what’s known as a new Solar Cycle. “We keep a detailed record of the few tiny sunspots that mark the onset and rise of the new cycle,” says Frédéric Clette, part of the panel and head of the World Data Centre for the Sunspot Index and Long-term Solar Observations (SILSO). “These are the diminutive heralds of future giant solar fireworks. It is only by tracking the general trend over many months that we can determine the tipping point between two cycles.”

See more from Sky at Night Magazine HERE:


"Who owns our orbit: Just how many satellites are there in space?"

Satellites are a vital part of our infrastructure, helping us to use GPS, access the internet and support studies of the Earth. Out of the 2,666 operational satellites circling the globe in April 2020, 1,007 were for communication services. 446 are used for observing the Earth and 97 for navigation/ GPS purposes.  "For centuries, humans have looked to space and the stars for answers. The fascination is more than philosophical—it’s coupled with the need to solve problems here on Earth. Today, there are seemingly countless benefits and applications of space technology. Satellites, for instance, are becoming critical for everything from internet connectivity and precision agriculture, to border security and archaeological study. Space is open for business. Right now, there are nearly 6,000 satellites circling our tiny planet. About 60% of those are defunct satellites—space junk—and roughly 40% are operational. As highlighted in the chart above, The Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS), determined that 2,666 operational satellites circled the globe in April of 2020. Over the coming decade, it’s estimated by Euroconsult that 990 satellites will be launched every year. This means that by 2028, there could be 15,000 satellites in orbit."

See more from We Forum HERE:


"Are the Great Plains Headed for Another Dust Bowl?"

"Researchers say atmospheric dust in the region has doubled in the last 20 years, suggesting the increasingly dry region is losing more soil skyward. A new study shows dust storms have become more common and more severe on the Great Plains, leading some to wonder if the United States is headed for another Dust Bowl, reports Roland Pease for Science. With nearly half the country currently in drought and a winter forecast predicting continued dry weather for many of the afflicted regions, dust storms could become an even bigger threat. In the 1930s, the Dust Bowl was caused by years of severe drought and featured dust storms up to 1,000 miles long. But the other driving force behind the plumes of dust that ravaged the landscape was the conversion of prairie to agricultural fields on a massive scale—between 1925 and the early 1930s, farmers converted 5.2 million acres of grassland over to farming, reported Sarah Zielinski for Smithsonian magazine in 2012."

See more from Smithsonian Mag HERE:


Thanks for checking in and don't forget to follow me on Twitter @TNelsonWX

Rare Late October Snow & Cold. Warmer By Halloween?

Heavy Snow in Central Minnesota on Thursday
 
This was the view from Parkers Prairie, MN, where there were reports of nearly 6" of wet heavy snow. This caused some major issues on area roads, but fell at record levels in many locations for mid to late October. Thanks Jakki for the picture!!
 
(Image credit: Jakki Meyers)

 
Reports of Brown Snow on Thursday?
 
Did you happen to notice the brown/orange tint to the sky or snow on Thursday? Interestingly, wildfires from northern Colorado are to blame. Smoke plumes from those fires got wrapped up into the storm system that dropped snow on our local area. Take a look at the report from the National Weather Service below.
 
 
(Image Credit: @NWSTwinCities)
 

Satellite of Smoke From Colorado Wildfires

Here was a visible satellite image from Thursday afternoon, which showed a narrow band of smoke from the northern Colorado Wildfires that got swept up into the storm system that dropped wintry precipitation across Minnesota. I know it may be hard to see, but there were many reports of an orange sky during periods of sleet and snow in the Twin Cities metro on Thursday. 

Here's a closer look at the clouds and thin smoke plume... Can you see the smoke plume?


 
2nd Snowiest October on Record at MSP
 
I never thought I'd see the day where a snowfall record from the Great Hallloween Blizzard of 1991 would be eclipsed. Note that we are only 0.2" away from setting a new snowfall record for the snowiest October on record at MSP. We are currently at 8.1", which has accumulated over a 3 day period. Back in 1991, that 8.2" fell on Halloween Day back in 1991.
 
 

More Snow PM Saturday - Sunday
 
Here's a look at our Sunday system, which brushes southern Minnesota with snow and light accumulations. I'm thinking that we'll break snowiest October on record or at least tie it as this seems to be a fairly decent chance at light snow accumulation potential in the metro.
 

Snowfall Potential

Both the American (GFS) and European (ECMWF) weather models suggest light snow accumulations across the southern part of the state with light amounts possible even in the metro. Stay tuned for further updates.

 
 

Fall Color Update

Welp - I hope you enjoyed the fall colors this year. It always goes fast, but this year seemed to go even faster.
 

Friday Weather Outlook for Minneapolis

Temps on Friday will still be running well below average with temps feeling more like December. Grab an extra layer or two, you're going to need it.
 
 

Monday Meteograms for Minneapolis

Here's the forecast for Friday, which looks better than Thursday, however, we'll still be well below average for this time of the year. 


Monday Weather Outlook

High temps on Friday will be nearly -20F below average for late October. In fact, we maybe close to record cold high temps for this time of the year. What is this, December?


Extended Temperature Outlook For Minneapolis

What the? The extended forecast looks more like December. Temps will continue to run nearly -20F below average and near record old lows. I hope this isn't a harbinger of times to come this winter.

 

Extended Temperature Outlook For Minneapolis

The extended outlook through the end of October shows some pretty chilly temps, but there may be some modest warming by Halloween and into early November. Stay tuned.


 
Average First Measurable Snow at MSP
 
In case you were wondering, the average first measurable snow (0.1") in the Twin Cities Metro is right around the first week of November. In the last 30 years, the earliest we've seen measurable snow was on October 10th back in 2009. The latest 1st measurable snow of the season happened on November 11th back in 2004.

Average First 1" Snowfall at MSP

The first 1" of snow typically happens around the 3rd or 4th week is November. The lastest first 1" of snow didn't fall in the metro until January 1st, back in 2005!


Drought Update

According to the US Drought Monitor, drought conditions are about the same as they were last week. 
 

 
8-14 Day Precipitation Outlook
 
According to NOAA's Climate Prediction Center, much of the nation should be fairly dry by early November.

8-14 Day Tempearture Outlook
 
According to NOAA's Climate Prediction Center, there might be a lingering chill across the eastern half of the nation. 
_______________________________________________________________________

Rare Late October Snow & Cold. Warmer Early Nov.
By Todd Nelson, filling in for Douglas

Cue the music. Welcome to "the middle ground between light and shadow, science and superstition. Welcome to the dimension of imagination, an area we call the Twilight Zone."

I don't know about you, but I still get creeped out when I hear that theme song. I also got a little chill down my spine when I heard reports of thundersleet on Thursday. Keep in mind that the average high in the Twin Cities is 55 degrees, so we've indeed entered a bizarre, mid-winter like world. Uffda!

Tuesday and Thursday saw rare, record snowfall across parts of the state and now we'll have several days of rare, record setting cold. Not only will there be record cold low temperatures, but record cold low high temps will be possible as well. Excuse me?

The rarity of this late October cold will give your furnace a decent workout through most of next week. Interestingly, there's another shot of snow on Sunday with light accumulations possible south of the Metro.

On a warmer note, models are suggesting a modest warming trend into early November. Stay tuned!


Extended Forecast

FRIDAY: Icy start. Slow clearing. Winds: NNW 10-15. High: 36.

FRIDAY NIGHT: Mostly cloudy. Winds: SE 5. Low: 17.

SATURDAY: Clouds thicken early. Flurries late? Winds: ENE 5. High: 32.

SUNDAY: More snow. Light accumulations southern MN. Winds: N 5-10. Wake-up: 27. High: 32.

MONDAY: More PM sun. Record cold high temps. Winds: WSW 5-10. Wake-up: 20. High: 29.

TUESDAY: December-like. Average high: 53F. Winds: WSW 5-10. Wake-up: 15. High: 30.

WEDNESDAY: More clouds. Light mix northern MN. Winds: W 5-10. Wake-up: 20. High: 35.

THURSDAY: Still feels like mid November. Winds: NNW 5-10. Wake-up: 23. High: 40.


This Day in Weather History
October 23rd

1899: An unseasonably warm day occurs in the Twin Cities, with a high of 82.


Average High/Low for Minneapolis
October 23rd

Average High: 57F (Record: 84F set in 2000)
Average Low: 39F (Record: 15F set in 1972)

Record Rainfall: 2.75" set in 1934
Record Snowfall: 1.3" set in 1916


Sunrise/Sunset Times for Minneapolis
October 23rd

Sunrise: 7:34am
Sunset: 6:20pm

Hours of Daylight: ~10 hours & 46 minutes

Daylight LOST since yesterday: ~ 2 minutes & 59 seconds
Daylight LOST since Summer Solstice (June 20th): ~ 4 hour & 51 minutes


Moon Phase for October 23rd at Midnight
3.5 Days Since New Moon


What's in the Night Sky?

"The Orionid meteor shower will peak around mid-week, with the best morning likely being Wednesday, October 21. Try watching on the mornings of October 20 and 22, too. In 2020, the moon will be a waxing crescent at the shower’s peak. That means the moon will set in the evening hours, or before the constellation Orion – the radiant of the Orionid shower – rises in the east at late evening. The Orionids start producing meteors at late evening but the number of meteors increases after midnight. Typically, the greatest number of Orionid meteors streak the sky during the few hours before dawn. In a moonless sky, you can see as many as 10 to 15 meteors per hour at the Orionids’ peak. These meteors – vaporizing bits of comet debris from Halley’s Comet – look like streaks of light in the night sky. Many people call them shooting stars."

See more from Earth Sky HERE:

(Image Credit: EarthSky.org)


 
National High Temps Friday
 
Temps will be running well be average across the northern tier of the nation on Friday and near record cold low high temps
 

National Forecast Map For Friday

The National Forecast on Friday will bring a few isolated strong to severe storms east of the cold front. Another winter storm is in the making across the northern Rockies.


National Weather Outlook

Here's the national weather outlook into the weekend, which shows a fairly decent winter storm unfolding across the High Plains. 


Delta Rains Move Northeast; Heavy Precipitation in the Northwest.

Here's the 7-day preciptation outlook across the nation, which shows heavy rain across the eastern half of the nation. 


National Snowfall Potential

The national snow over the next several days suggests areas of decent snowfall potential as we enter the back half of October.


Ongoing Wildfires in the Western US

"Critical fire weather remains in effect across much of Northern California, with firefighters on high alert for the possibility of new fast moving wildfires. Over 6,000 firefighters remain committed to 19 wildfires in California, 12 of which remain major incidents. Yesterday, firefighters responded to 11 new initial attack wildfires across the State, all of which have been contained. Several Red Flag Warnings issued by the National Weather Service remain in effect across Northern California due to critical fire weather. Strong winds are likely to continue through Friday evening across portions of interior northern California stretching from Redding down to Vacaville, as well as through the parts of the Sierra Foothills. These areas could experience wind gusts of up to 45mph. A Red Flag Warning went into effect last night for many parts of the Bay Area. This warning is in effect through Friday afternoon for gusty winds and low humidity in the North Bay Mountains, areas of the East Bay Hills, the Diablo Range and the Santa Cruz Mountains. A Red Flag Warning has also been issued for portions of Northwest California starting early Thursday through Friday due to gusty winds. Learn more about these warnings in this short video: https://youtu.be/ImAGkPaiPM8."

 
 

Tropical Update

The tropics aren't dead yet. There are still a couple of areas that the NHC is monitoring. Will this be the most active Tropical Season on record? Stay tuned!!


Tracking Epsilon

Epsilon will quickly move northeast of Bermuda this weekend.

 

No More Regular Alphabet Names

It has been an active season so far as we've used up all 21 names that NOAA's NHC set for the year. Interestingly, Tropical Storm Arthur developed back in mid May, more than 4 months ago! Since then, we've had a total of 9 huricanes!


We're Into the Greek Alphabet - First Time Since 2005

Not only did we use up all 21 names in the list above, but we've entered the Greek Alphabet, which is only the 2nd time in recorded history that we've done that and the first time since 2005. Delta became the 25th named storm and the 9th hurricane of the 2020 Atlantic Hurricane Season.

 
 

Climate Stories

(Image Credit: NOAA)

"The U.S. Needs to Think Way Bigger About Offshore Wind"

"Rep. Raul Grijalva introduced a House bill yesterday that, if passed, would make oceans a central piece of climate policy. The legislation includes many good and important ideas, including stopping all offshore oil and gas drilling, pouring resources into marine ecosystem restoration, making fisheries more climate resilient, and allocating funds for Indigenous communities’ climate resilience efforts. Crucially, the bill also aims to ramp up America’s offshore wind production. But the goals it sets show how much bigger we need to be thinking when it comes to renewable energy. The U.S. is already a huge laggard on offshore wind. Europe has 105 offshore wind farms in operation that produce about 18.5 gigawatts of power. Meanwhile, over here, we’ve only got one up and running, and it produces just 30 megawatts—or three one-hundredths of a gigawatt. Grijalva’s bill aims to up that production to 25 gigawatts by 2030, with an intermediate goal of 12.5 gigawatts by 2025. Based on current production, that looks like a pretty ambitious target. But dig a little deeper, and it’s clear the U.S. could be aiming much higher. American offshore wind energy generation potential is ginormous. According to the Department of Energy, U.S. shores could yield more than 2,000 gigawatts of power. That’s nearly double the country’s current total electricity use."

See more from Gizmodo HERE:


"More pollution expected from stay-home workers"

"Air pollution in big cities could increase because so many people are working from home, a report says. Gas burning from boilers is a major source of local pollution, accounting for 21% of total NOx  emissions across Greater London, for instance. Computer modelling predicts that boiler use will rise by 56% this winter due to coronavirus changing work patterns. The report assumes that workers’ offices will continue to be heated for staff still needed in the workplace. It also assumes that NOx emissions from cars will stay roughly the same, because although fewer people are going to the office, many are using cars when previously they would have taken buses or trains. The study from the think tank ECIU warns that the predicted spike in emissions may threaten the UK’s legally binding air quality targets.  'Forgotten role'  It says the increase in energy use may driving up NOx emissions by approximately 12% in towns and cities – enough to offset the last two years’ worth of progress on reducing traffic emissions. The report says: “The increase in pollution from gas boilers provides a graphic illustration of their forgotten role in contributing to air pollution.” Some estimates suggest that energy bills will rise on average £32 a month through home working. But that could be offset by a decrease in the costs of commuting."

See more from BBC HERE:


"On climate clock, it's parts per million, not minutes, that matter most"

"Experts regularly caution time is running out for addressing climate challenges most effectively, but the metric to focus on isn't hours or even years, but rather units of increased greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. As sentient but fallible human beings, we often are cautioned about excessively watching the clock. Even on their worst days, we all know, they’re right at least twice daily. Watching the clock has its rightful place in many practices. Take the various shot-clocks in basketball or the five-seconds in which to pass the ball in bounds, the service clock in pro tennis, the delay-of-game clock in football. In the climate change policy context, the clock can be both enemy and friend. Who can forget how many times we’ve been warned – albeit with lots of leeway in varying from the original reference – about having “only 12 years” remaining in which to, as the story gets infinitely re-told and restated, save the world and all humanity?"

See more from Yale Climate Connections HERE:


Thanks for checking in and don't forget to follow me on Twitter @TNelsonWX