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Continued: Sochi braces in ‘ring of steel’

  • Article by: KIMBERLY DOZIER , Associated Press
  • Last update: February 4, 2014 - 9:18 PM

The Olympic Park and Olympic Village railway stations — critical transportation hubs for moving people from the coastal region to the mountain events — look more like airports than rail terminals.

The number of police officers, soldiers and Russian Cossacks walking beats at the stations has grown in recent days. A security force of 40,000 — police officers, military and Federal Security Service agents — are expected to descend on this city of 400,000 for the Games.

Passengers must go through metal detectors, have their bags X-rayed, and have suspicious contents examined before gaining entry to the stations. If the metal detectors go off or something doesn’t look or feel right, stern-looking security officials donned in purplish patchwork quilt-style warm-up suits are at the ready to provide a thorough pat down.

There’s been an increase in recent days in the number of police officers and soldiers who stroll the aisles of passenger trains. Recordings in English and Russian over the train’s loudspeakers urge passengers to watch out for and report suspicious items.

Television cameras monitor the tracks along the high-speed rail line to mountainous Krasnaya Polyana. And security forces were stationed under the rail route’s bridges and the underpasses of the highway next to the tracks.

 

The McClatchy Washington Bureau contributed to this report.



 

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