Iraq developments

  • Updated: September 20, 2007 - 9:01 PM

U.S. troops arrested an Iranian on Thursday it identified as an officer in the Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corp's elite Quds force. He was nabbed during an early morning raid in the northern Iraqi city of Sulaimaniyah and accused of helping to smuggle a deadly type of roadside bomb into Iraq. The Kurdish Regional Government said the man was Aghai Farhadi, who claimed to be a member of an economic and commercial delegation.

The World Health Organization confirmed the first cholera case in Baghdad since 2003, raising fears the disease is spreading from the north of the country where it has struck more than 1,000 people. Cholera is typically spread by drinking contaminated water and can lead, in extreme cases, to fatal dehydration. At least 10 people have died.

The U.S. Senate rejected legislation that would have cut off money for combat in Iraq by June. It was a predictable defeat for Democrats struggling to pass less divisive anti-war measures. The 28-70 vote was 32 short of the 60 needed to cut off a GOP filibuster.

The Senate also voted to chastise MoveOn.org, a liberal antiwar group that accused Gen. David Petraeus, the commander in Iraq, of betrayal. The 72-25 vote condemned a full-page ad that appeared in the New York Times last week as Petraeus testified on Capitol Hill. The ad was headlined: "General Petraeus or General Betray Us? Cooking the books for the White House."

The Kuwaiti company building the U.S. embassy in Baghdad has been accused of agreeing to pay $200,000 in kickbacks in return for two unrelated Army contracts in Iraq. The scheme, outlined in a now-sealed court document, allegedly involved First Kuwaiti General Trading & Contracting and a manager for Kellogg Brown & Root Inc.

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