DETROIT — The Latest on the U.S. Supreme Court decision upholding President Donald Trump's ban on travel from several mostly Muslim countries. (all times local):

8:30 p.m.

Hundreds of demonstrators have rallied outside the federal courthouse in downtown Minneapolis to oppose the U.S. Supreme Court ruling upholding the Trump administration's travel ban.

Protesters gathered Tuesday evening held signs reading "No Muslim ban ever" and "Demand an end to anti-Muslim bigotry." At one point the crowd chanted, "The Muslim ban will not stand."

State Rep. Ilhan Omar, a Minneapolis Democrat running for the U.S. House, spoke of the difficulty of Muslims being singled out for extra scrutiny at airports. Omar said those imposing the travel ban "forget there are real people who are going to be impacted."

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8:10 p.m.

The Supreme Court's decision to uphold President Donald Trump's travel ban is being met with outrage and heartbreak at demonstrations.

Immigrant-rights activists crowded into the park across the street from the federal courthouse in lower Manhattan on Tuesday to voice their dismay at the decision.

Protesters chanted, cheered and held signs reading "No ban, no wall."

The crowd included those separated from family as a result of the ban, which covers people from five countries with predominantly Muslim populations: Iran, Libya, Somalia, Syria and Yemen as well as North Korea and some Venezuelan government officials and their families.

Khulood Nasher has been trying to bring her sons from Yemen for the past four years.

She says that "today, we were broken."

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6:20 p.m.

U.S. Rep. Colleen Hanabusa of Hawaii says she's not surprised at the U.S. Supreme Court decision upholding President Donald Trump's travel ban, but she called the ruling "unfortunate."

In a statement Tuesday, Hanabusa said that as a resident of Hawaii, where many are descended from migrant laborers, and as the granddaughter of immigrants she has a deep appreciation for the opportunity offered by the U.S. She added, "We cannot allow this president to discriminate against any group or apply divisive tactics and racism to the formation of public policy."

Hanabusa said the one good thing to come from the ruling is that it overturned a 1944 decision that that supported the internment of Japanese Americans during WWII.

She said, "We must never forget what can happen when hate and racism inspire government action."

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5:45 p.m.

A nonprofit group that supports President Donald Trump's policies says a Supreme Court ruling in favor of his travel ban is a "tremendous victory."

Erin Montgomery is a spokeswoman for America First Policies. She says, "Today's Supreme Court ruling is monumental. It states that deciding who can and cannot enter our country does indeed fall within the realm of executive responsibility. Note the word 'responsibility.'"

Montgomery called the ruling "a tremendous victory for President Trump," but also a victory "for every single American who understands that America is only as strong as its inhabitants ..." She asserted that Americans' safety and security "depend on a President's sacred responsibility to lawfully vet each and every person who seeks to cross that threshold."

The court on Tuesday rejected a challenge that the policy discriminated against Muslims or exceeded the president's authority.

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5:30 p.m.

A Muslim imam in Hawaii who has challenged President Donald Trump's travel ban says his family remains separated because of the ban.

Ismail Elshikh, the imam of the Muslim Association of Hawaii, is a plaintiff in Hawaii's lawsuit challenging the travel ban. During challenges to different versions of the policy, his mother-in-law could not visit from Syria, but eventually was able to obtain permanent U.S. residency. But he says other family members in Syria are blocked from visiting because of the ban.

He says, "My kids always ask me how we can meet our family — aunties, uncles. ... They only want their family to be here, to be with them in celebration, happy times."

He adds, "I think one day will come our efforts ... will be rewarded over the long arc of history that bend toward justice."

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5 p.m.

The pastor of the church that the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. once led has condemned the U.S. Supreme Court's decision to uphold President Donald Trump's ban on travel from several mostly Muslim countries.

The Rev. Raphael Warnock of Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta said the ban was about imposing a "religious test" on those entering the United States.

He said, "The Supreme Court's decision today was not only an injustice committed against our Muslim sisters and brothers, it's a threat to justice everywhere."

Warnock stood with faith leaders from Atlanta's other religious communities in front of the church to denounce the ruling.

He added, "They've made bad decisions time and time again, and it's the American people who have had to stand up to remind our elected officials —and even those on the judiciary— who we are."

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2:45 p.m.

Hawaii's attorney general says Tuesday's U.S. Supreme Court ruling upholding President Donald Trump's ban on travel from several mostly Muslim countries calls for vigilance against Trump's "discriminatory policies."

Attorney General Russell Suzuki says he is "profoundly disappointed" in the ruling and continues to believe Trump's travel ban is unconstitutional. In a statement he added, "We must remain vigilant and continue to challenge the president's unprecedented, unjust actions, and protect Hawaii residents from his discriminatory policies."

The case that came before the court was originally filed in a Hawaii federal court. The latest version of the ban applies to travelers from five Muslim-majority nations —Iran, Libya, Somalia, Syria and Yemen— as well as North Korea and Venezuela.

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2:25 p.m.

The Rev. Jesse Jackson says President Donald Trump's travel ban was not about national security, but religious discrimination against Muslims.

In a statement, Jackson says the majority ruling ignored Trump's tweets, statements, and speeches in upholding the executive order.

Later in a telephone interview with The Associated Press, Jackson called Trump an extremist and a white nationalist, and said that "this is a religious doctrine."

Jackson added that the Trump administration's now-canceled policy of separating children from parents is a "crime against humanity" and ignores the history of Jesus Christ, who had to flee his country of birth as a child.

The civil rights activist says that the midterm elections are shaping up to be a "crucial battle for the soul of our country" and encouraged people to express their dissent at the polling booth.

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1:45 p.m.

As Syrians face violence in their native country and a ban on entering the U.S., the head of the Syrian American Council says many are scared.

Suzanne Meriden, a Syrian-American, is the group's executive director. She called Tuesday "a very sad and difficult day for the Syrian community," with the Supreme Court upholding a travel ban on travel from several mostly Muslim countries. Syria is one of the countries covered by the ban.

The ruling comes amid a massive government offensive in Daraa, near the Jordanian border, and as Jordan has announced it will not take any more Syrians fleeing the violence.

Meriden choked up as she said, "It's sad on so many levels. I never cry. We're here to calm people but I just get stressed out about it all. You try to hold yourself together but sometimes it's too hard."

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1:10 p.m.

Oxfam America says it's "dismayed" the U.S. Supreme Court has upheld President Donald Trump's controversial ban on travelers from certain Muslim-majority nations.

Noah Gottschalk, of the Boston-based charitable organization, said Tuesday's 5-4 decision upholds an "un-American" policy that "institutionalizes" religious discrimination and sends a signal the world the U.S. "no longer believes the fundamental tenet that all people are created equal."

John Robbins, head of the Massachusetts chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations, said separately that allowing the travel ban to stand impacts the state's education and health care sectors since many professors, doctors and researchers hail from the affected countries.

Trump's travel ban applies to travelers from five Muslim-majority nations —Iran, Libya, Somalia, Syria and Yemen— as well as North Korea and Venezuela.

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12:35 p.m.

An official with Catholic Relief Services says the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled on the legality of President Donald Trump's ban on travel from several mostly Muslim countries, but not on its morality.

Bill O'Keefe is the organization's vice president for government relations. He said in a written statement Tuesday that many of the people seeking refuge in the U.S. are victims of the same terrorists that Americans are trying to fight. He says denying them entry won't make the nation safer.

He added that, "We must not turn our backs on suffering people during their most difficult hours."

The court on Tuesday rejected a challenge that the policy discriminated against Muslims or exceeded the president's authority.

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12:10 p.m.

The first Muslim elected to Congress says the Supreme Court ruling decision upholding President Donald Trump's ban on travel from several mostly Muslim countries is unjust and "will someday serve as a marker of shame."

Democratic U.S. Rep. Keith Ellison of Minnesota likened it to court decisions that upheld Japanese internment camps during World War II and "separate but equal" laws during the Jim Crow era in the American South.

Ellison called for a fight "for an America that recognizes that every human life has value and reflects our values of generosity and inclusion for all."

Ellison said the decision undermines the core value of religious tolerance on which America was founded.

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11:35 a.m.

A conservative group that supports tighter immigration policies is heralding a U.S. Supreme Court decision upholding President Donald Trump's ban on travel from several mostly Muslim countries.

The Federation for American Immigration Reform tweeted Tuesday that, "The Supreme Court's travel ban decision is a great victory for the security of the American people and the rule of law."

The group added that, "Congress has delegated to the president clear, unambiguous authority to suspend the entry of aliens into the United States."

FAIR says it fights for "a stronger America with controlled borders, reduced immigration and better enforcement."

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11:25 a.m.

An Alabama-based civil rights law organization says it's disappointed with the Supreme Court decision upholding President Donald Trump's ban on travel from several mostly Muslim countries, calling the policy "a hateful and discriminatory Muslim ban."

Heidi Beirich is director of the Southern Poverty Law Center's Intelligence Project. She says that in crafting the policy, the Trump administration relied on "misinformation from a hate group - the Center for Security Policy - which uses demonizing and false rhetoric to vilify Muslims in the U.S. and create a climate of fear."

Beirich says the administration has ramped up anti-Muslim hate. She says anti-Muslim hate groups and hate crimes have increased during Trump's presidency.

She insisted that, "Immigration policy should never be decided based on race or religion."

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11:10 a.m.

Hawaii's former attorney general, who led his state's challenge to President Donald Trump's travel ban last year, is voicing pain over the U.S. Supreme Court decision upholding the ban on travel from several mostly Muslim countries — but he says he has hope, too.

Doug Chin, now the state's lieutenant governor, says in a statement that, "I hurt today for Hawaii families and others who have experienced discrimination and scapegoating due to President Trump's bullying remarks and orders."

But he added, "I am fortified, however, by the spirit of all those who came before us and struggled for the American dream. The path to civil rights does not always come quickly, but I have faith in humanity and believe justice will eventually prevail."

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11 a.m.

An Islamic rights group says the Supreme Court's decision upholding President Donald Trump's ban on travel from several mostly Muslim countries is "not the end of the road," but a step toward electing a new Congress that will take the nation in a different direction.

Wilfredo Ruiz is a Florida spokesman for the Council on American-Islamic Relations. He says opponents of the ban "will now look to counteract it in November by electing "a Congress that has different mentality on immigration and civil rights."

Ruiz says the majority on the high court "chose to ignore Trump's animus toward Muslims by ignoring statements during the 2016 campaign calling for a ban on their immigration."

He adds that, "His bigotry should have been as clear to the Supreme Court as it was to Muslims."

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10:50 a.m.

A civil rights attorney is expressing extreme disappointment in a U.S. Supreme Court decision upholding President Donald Trump's ban on travel from several mostly Muslim countries.

In a statement emailed to The Associated Press, American Civil Liberties Union attorney Lee Gelernt says it's a situation "in which there is a complete disconnect between the court's decision and what the American people know as a matter of common sense ..."

The court on Tuesday rejected a challenge that the policy discriminated against Muslims or exceeded the president's authority.

Gelernt says it's clear "that the president for political reasons chose to enact a Muslim ban despite national security experts, both Democrat and Republican" who counseled against it.

He says it's "too early to know exactly what our next steps are."