BOSTON — The Latest on the resignation of former Massachusetts Senate President Stan Rosenberg, whose husband was charged with sexual misconduct (all times local):

4:35 p.m.

The Massachusetts Senate has formally accepted the resignation of its former president, Stan Rosenberg, and is apologizing to anyone who was affected by the events that led to his departure.

In a rare statement issued by the entire chamber, Democrats and Republicans, senators thanked witnesses who came forward during an ethics investigation of Rosenberg. The report concluded that Rosenberg failed to protect the Senate from his husband, Bryon Hefner, who is charged with sexual misconduct.

"You deserved better. We must do better," the statement read.

Rosenberg, who will formally leave the Senate at 5 p.m. on Friday, also apologized to anyone affected by the events described in the report.

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2:25 p.m.

Former Massachusetts Senate President Stan Rosenberg says he's resigning from the Senate because he would no longer be able to fully represent the interests of his constituents.

Rosenberg delivered his brief letter of resignation to the Senate on Thursday, the day after a scathing ethics report said he demonstrated poor judgment and failed to protect the Senate from his husband, Bryon Hefner, who faces sexual assault and other charges.

The Amherst Democrat will officially leave the Senate at 5 p.m. Friday.

Rosenberg said he deeply regrets the difficulties he has caused the Senate and apologized to anyone affected by the actions that were described by investigators.

But Rosenberg also noted that the report found no evidence that he violated any Senate rules, or that his now estranged husband influenced his actions as Senate leader.

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1 p.m.

Former Massachusetts Senate President Stan Rosenberg is resigning after a scathing ethics report said he failed to protect the Senate from his husband, who is charged with sexual misconduct.

In a letter sent Thursday, Rosenberg said he would resign from his seat at 5 p.m. Friday.

The letter was delivered as senators were holding a closed-door caucus to discuss the ethics report, which cited lapses of judgment and leadership, including allowing Bryan Hefner to access Rosenberg's Senate email account.

Several Democratic senators, along with Republican Gov. Charlie Baker and Democratic Attorney General Maura Healey, had called on Rosenberg to resign his seat. He had stepped down as Senate president in December.

Hefner has pleaded not guilty to charges including sexual assault.

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10:43 a.m.

Members of the Massachusetts Senate plan a closed-door caucus to discuss a highly critical ethics report about former Senate President Stan Rosenberg, whose husband has been charged with sexual misconduct.

The meeting on Thursday will come prior to a formal session of the Senate and amid calls from top state officials and several lawmakers for the Democrat to resign.

The report prepared by investigators hired by the Senate Ethics Committee cited lapses of judgment and leadership, but did not accuse Rosenberg of violating Senate rules or being aware of any alleged criminal behavior by Hefner, who has pleaded not guilty to the charges.

Republican Gov. Charlie Baker and Democratic Attorney General Maura Healey are among those calling for Rosenberg's resignation.

Rosenberg has not yet commented on the report.