PHOENIX — The Latest on a court ruling upholding Phoenix's anti-discrimination law in a lawsuit brought by a wedding invitation business (all times local):

11:40 a.m.

The mayor of Phoenix is applauding a ruling by an Arizona court that upheld the city's anti-discrimination ordinance that includes the treatment of same-sex couples.

Mayor Thelda Williams commented on the decision Thursday that compels a company that makes wedding invitations to provide service to same-sex couples.

Williams called the ruling an important victory and a reminder that Phoenix believes in equality.

The Arizona Court of Appeals sided with the city in a lawsuit brought by the owners of the invitation business.

Attorneys for Brush & Nib Studio had argued the law would force them to cater to same-sex couples and violate their religious freedom.

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday for a Colorado baker who wouldn't make a wedding cake for a same-sex couple.

The decision, however, didn't address the larger issue of whether a business can invoke religious objections to refuse service to gay and lesbian people.

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10:25 a.m.

Attorneys for a Phoenix wedding invitation business plan to appeal a court ruling that compels the company to provide service to same-sex couples.

Lawyer Jonathan Scruggs of the group Alliance Defending Freedom said the Arizona Court of Appeals' decision on Thursday forces artists to do work contrary to their core beliefs.

A Phoenix city ordinance prohibits discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity.

The owners of Brush & Nib Studio claimed in a 2016 lawsuit that the city law violates their freedom of speech and religion. The owners are Christians.

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday for a Colorado baker who wouldn't make a wedding cake for a same-sex couple.

That decision didn't decide the larger issue of whether a business can invoke religious objections to refuse service to gay and lesbian people.

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7:50 a.m.

An Arizona court on Thursday upheld Phoenix's anti-discrimination ordinance, denying a wedding invitation business owners' challenge that the local law violates their freedom of religion by compelling them to cater to same-sex couples.

The state Court of Appeals' ruling upholds a trial judge's October denial of the business owner's request for a preliminary injunction barring enforcement of the ordinance.

The Phoenix anti-discrimination ordinance prohibits businesses from discriminating based on sexual orientation and gender identity.

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday for a Colorado baker who wouldn't make a wedding cake for a same-sex couple. That decision didn't decide the larger issue of whether a business can invoke religious objections to refuse service to gay and lesbian people.

The Arizona ruling can be appealed to the state Supreme Court.