ST. PAUL, Minn. — The Latest on Gov. Mark Dayton's vetoes of two major bills (all times local):

4 p.m.

Gov. Mark Dayton's veto of a massive budget bill means Minnesota can't tap $6 million in federal funds for election cybersecurity until after the November elections.

The federal government allocated the money earlier, but the Secretary of State's office can't spend it without legislative authorization. That authorization was in the budget bill Dayton vetoed Wednesday.

Secretary of State Steve Simon says he repeatedly asked lawmakers to put the language in a non-controversial, stand-alone bill that Dayton would sign. But he says lawmakers chose the "riskiest path" by putting it instead in a bill Dayton repeatedly promised to veto.

Simon says lawmakers "gambled and lost," leaving the state with a "bad and completely avoidable outcome."

Simon has said he expects Russian operatives to try again to hack the 2018 elections.

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3:45 p.m.

Top Republicans say Gov. Mark Dayton's decision to veto major tax and spending bills was vindictive.

The Democratic governor's vetoes Wednesday knocked down the two biggest pieces of legislation that the Republican-controlled Legislature pushed through just as time was running out. Dayton said a so-called tax conformity bill didn't do enough for middle-class taxpayers and criticized a major spending package as being stuffed with objectionable policy.

Senate Majority Leader Paul Gazelka said Wednesday he was shocked by Dayton's decision. He had hoped to meet with Dayton later Wednesday to make his case that the governor should sign the bills.

GOP House Speaker Kurt Daudt says the governor is a failure.

The budget bill would have issued aid to schools in budget crunches and helped them pay for security improvements.

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11 a.m.

Gov. Mark Dayton has vetoed the tax conformity and budget bills that state lawmakers passed in the waning days of the session.

The Democratic governor's veto knocks down the two biggest pieces of legislation that the Republican-controlled Legislature pushed through just as time was running out.

Dayton has said that the so-called tax conformity bill did too little for ordinary people. But the failure to arrive at an agreement sets Minnesotans up for problems when filing taxes next year. The bill is needed to get the state code in alignment with federal changes.

The massive budget bill was filled with spending important to many, including funding aimed at making schools safer.

Dayton has vowed not to call a special session.