MADISON, Wis. — The Latest on Wisconsin Republican lawmakers moving to limit the powers of the incoming Democratic governor and attorney general (all times local):

11:40 a.m.

Eight former leaders of Wisconsin's economic development agency who served under both Republicans and Democrats are speaking out against changes proposed in a lame-duck legislative session.

The former directors issued a statement Tuesday as the Republican-controlled Legislature prepared to pass a proposal weakening the governor's control over the state economic development agency.

The proposal would give the majority party in the Legislature more appointments than the governor to the Wisconsin Economic Development Corp. Two of the eight people who signed the statement were appointed by outgoing Republican Gov. Scott Walker. A third served under former Republican Gov. Tommy Thompson.

The other five served under former Democratic Gov. Jim Doyle.

Incoming Democratic Gov.-elect Tony Evers has said he wants to reorganize the job-creation agency.

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11:05 a.m.

Wisconsin's incoming Democratic attorney general is predicting multiple lawsuits challenging Republican lame-duck legislation limiting the powers of both his office and Democratic Gov.-elect Tony Evers.

Attorney General-elect Josh Kaul told reporters Tuesday that the legislation undermines the will of voters who elected him and Evers.

He says the legislation is "virtually certain" to generate lawsuits across multiple courts. He says the state will be mired in litigation next year.

The legislation would allow legislators to replace the attorney general with outside attorneys in cases, require lawmakers to sign off on settlements, send settlement dollars to the state general fund and prohibit the governor from authorizing the attorney general to withdraw from lawsuits.

Kaul says that's designed to prevent Evers from ordering him to withdraw from a multi-state lawsuit challenging federal health care laws.

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1:29 a.m.

Wisconsin Republicans are planning dramatic lame-duck votes in the state Legislature on a sweeping attempt to limit the powers of the incoming Democratic governor and attorney general.

Opponents decried the moves as a last-gasp power grab and an attempt to invalidate the election where Republican Gov. Scott Walker was defeated.

Once approved by the Legislature on Tuesday, the measures would head to Walker for his signature just five weeks before he is replaced by Democrat Tony Evers.

A Republican-controlled committee voted to approve the bills around midnight Monday, following a nine-hour public hearing where all but one person spoke against the measures.

A proposal to move the 2020 presidential primary election from April to March appears to be dead after the committee did not vote to advance it.