AMMAN, Jordan — The Latest on developments in Jordan (all times local):

3:30 p.m.

Jordan's royal palace says King Abdullah II has accepted the resignation of embattled Prime Minister Hani Mulki.

Mulki submitted his resignation to Abdullah earlier on Monday, in the wake of the largest anti-government protests since 2011. Thousands have taken to the streets in recent days to protest against a planned tax increase and a series of price hikes for basics such as fuel and electricity.

A government-linked daily says Omar Razzaz, a leading reformer and the current education minister, has been tapped as Jordan's next prime minister. The Al-Rai newspaper reported that the Harvard-educated Razzaz would succeed Mulki in the post.

There was no immediate official confirmation that Razzaz has been appointed as Mulki's successor.

Mulki served for two years as the head of an unpopular government tasked with implementing economic reforms sought by the International Monetary Fund.

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2:20 p.m.

Official media say Jordan's embattled prime minister has submitted his resignation amid mounting anti-government protests over a planned tax increase and recent price hikes of fuel and other basic goods.

Websites Hala Akhbar and Al-Rai reported that Hani Mulki informed Jordan's King Abdullah II of his decision on Monday. Hala Akhbar is linked to Jordan's military and Al-Rai is a state-run daily.

It's unclear if Mulki's departure will suffice to defuse growing public anger, manifested in the past few days in the largest street protests in the kingdom in recent years.

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2 p.m.

An official website says Jordan's embattled prime minister is heading to a meeting with King Abdullah II, in the wake of the largest anti-government protests in the kingdom since 2011.

Thousands have filled the streets of the kingdom in recent days to protest planned tax increases and have called for the resignation of Prime Minister Hani Mulki.

The Hala Akhbar site, linked to Jordan's military, says Mulki was on his way to the palace Monday.

The summoning of Mulki by the monarch has fueled speculation he might be asked to resign. It's unclear if his departure would suffice to defuse growing public anger over a series of austerity measures.

The king, who has final say on all policy issues, has frequently disbanded governments to manage crises of public confidence.