PHOENIX — The Latest on approval of big raises for Arizona teachers following a strike that closed most state schools (all times local):

1:30 p.m.

The grass-roots group that organized a historic Arizona teacher strike is calling an end to the walkout that affected 1 million students after raises and some school funding passed in the state budget.

Arizona Educators United said Thursday on Twitter that it was ending the strike as it entered its sixth day. It comes despite organizers saying the budget didn't take into account some of their demands.

Some school districts surrounding Phoenix, including large ones in the suburbs of Mesa, Scottsdale and Glendale, had said earlier in the day that they would reopen Friday.

But a large district in Tucson said it would need until Monday to be ready to welcome students again.

Many other large Arizona school districts hadn't announced plans their plans by midday.

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1 p.m.

A teachers' strike organizer says the Arizona budget approved by lawmakers and Gov. Doug Ducey "falls far short" of what is needed.

The plan offers raises and some school funding sought by teachers who have walked out of their classrooms in a historic statewide strike that's closed schools for six days.

Arizona Education Association President Joe Thomas said Thursday that the governor and some members of the Republican-controlled Legislature largely ignored many demands of educators, who will "remember that in the upcoming election."

Thomas says educators should focus on a campaign for a November ballot measure that would raise education funding from an income tax increase on wealthy residents.

Phoenix fifth-grade teacher Peggy Parker says the budget fails to address a lack of overtime compensation and money for classroom supplies. She says teachers "have a lot of work to do."

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11:40 a.m.

Arizona's largest school district and some others will resume classes after lawmakers approved money for teacher pay raises and additional education funding.

The state's largest district in the Phoenix suburb of Mesa announced it will reopen schools Friday following a week-long walkout by teachers.

But officials from Tucson's biggest school district say they won't be ready and are working to reopen 86 school sites on Monday.

An update posted Thursday on the Tucson district's website says officials need time to ensure that all schools have necessary staffing and transportation.

Other districts announcing Thursday that they'll reopen schools Friday include districts in the Phoenix suburbs of Scottsdale and Glendale.

Many other large Arizona school districts had not announced plans by midday Thursday on whether children would be able to attend on Friday.

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10 a.m.

A leading organizer of the walkout by Arizona's teachers says striking educators should take credit for the increased funding that state legislators approved for their raises in an all-night budget session.

Noah Karvelis of Arizona Educators United told hundreds of red-shirted teachers crowded outside the state Capitol Thursday morning that "the change happens with us."

Gov. Doug Ducey earlier signed part of a state budget plan that provides more than $300 million in raises for many of the state's striking teachers.

The action came after a weeklong teachers' strike that shut down classes for the majority of the state's 1.1 million public school students.

Teachers will get an average 9 percent pay boost this fall and 5 percent more in each of the next two years.

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9: 15 a.m.

Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey is hailing approval of budget legislation providing more than $300 million in raises for many of the state's striking teachers.

The Republican governor called the bill "a real win" for teachers and kids in from his office as he signed it Thursday morning after all-night legislative sessions by the GOP-controlled House and Senate

Meanwhile, some teachers returned to the Capitol on Thursday as the statewide walkout entered a sixth day.

Major school districts' schools remained closed under plans announced by districts Wednesday while legislative action on the budget was still uncertain.

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8:20 a.m.

Major Arizona school districts in metro Phoenix and Tucson were still closed for the day on Thursday following Gov. Ducey's signing of budget legislation providing more than $300 million in raises for many of the state's striking teachers.

Ducey signed the legislation Thursday morning soon after lawmakers approved it near the tail end of all-night House and Senate sessions.

The Scottsdale Unified School District in the Phoenix suburb of Scottsdale announced less than an hour later that its schools will reopen Friday. Phoenix Union High School District spokesman Craig Pletenik said that it may reopen schools on Friday.

Most school districts had cited uncertainty about when the week-old teacher walkout over pay and education funding would end when they announced Wednesday that their schools would remain closed Thursday.

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6:30 a.m.

Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey has signed part of a state budget plan that provides more than $300 million in raises for many of the state's striking teachers.

Thursday morning's signing came as the state House continued to debate other parts of the $10.4 billion spending plan but after the Senate concluded work on the plan.

The action came after a weeklong teachers' strike that shut down school for the great majority of the state's 1.1 million public school students. Teachers vowed to stay out until the funding package passed.

Teachers will get an average 9 percent pay boost this fall and 5 percent more in each of the next two years. The budget package also provides the state's schools will a partial restoration of nearly $400 million in recession-era cuts.

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5:30 a.m.

The Arizona Senate has passed a $10.4 billion state budget plan that provides more than $300 million in raises for many of the state's striking teachers after working all night.

The House was still debating the budget package Thursday morning but passage was assured.

The action came after a weeklong teachers' strike that shut down school for most of the state's 1.1 million public school students.

Strike leaders had called for an end to the walkout if the budget passed Wednesday.

But a daylong delay led them to essentially extend it, and many school districts ended up canceling classes for a sixth straight day Thursday.