CHICAGO — The Latest on announcement in Chicago of new plans to battle Mexican cartels (all times local):

5:15 p.m.

Drug Enforcement Administration officials in Chicago have unveiled some additional strategies in combating Mexican drug cartels alongside members of the Mexican government, military and federal police.

Mexico's deputy attorney general also told a joint news conference Wednesday that one priority is to capture the leader of the increasingly powerful Jalisco New Generation Cartel, Nemesio Oseguera Cervantes.

A DEA report last year called the cartel "one of the most powerful and fastest growing." Also on Wednesday in Mexico, authorities said they were offering a 30 million peso ($1.6 million) reward for the capture of Cervantes.

The new plans include putting greater emphasis on attacking cartels' financial infrastructure. But they don't include major departures from how both countries have gone after cartels for years. A longstanding strategy of going after cartel kingpins will continue.

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11 a.m.

Several Mexican government, military and federal police officials are joining their U.S. counterparts in Chicago to unveil new plans to combat Mexican drug cartels.

The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration says among those attending Wednesday's joint announcement are Mexico's acting attorney general, its chief director for the Criminal Investigations Agency and a brigadier general chief of staff at Mexico's Ministry of Defense.

The announcement will be a public display of bilateral cooperation amid ongoing tensions over President Donald Trump's trade and immigration policies.

The new plans include putting greater emphasis on attacking cartels' financial infrastructure. Strategies also call for a new enforcement group, based in Chicago, focused on international investigations.

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12:30 a.m.

Drug Enforcement Administration officials tell The Associated Press that new plans to combat Mexican drug cartels will be unveiled in Chicago alongside members of the Mexican government.

Wednesday's announcement at a joint news conference will be a public display of bilateral cooperation amid ongoing tensions over President Donald Trump's trade and immigration policies.

The new plans include putting greater emphasis on attacking cartels' financial infrastructure. Strategies also call for a new enforcement group, based in Chicago, focused on international investigations.

The DEA didn't immediately release the names of the Mexican officials attending the Chicago event.

The director for the DEA's North and Central American Region, Matthew Donahue, told the AP Tuesday the U.S. wants cooperation with Mexico "to be a little more efficient, a little bit more aggressive."