• Common carp, which many consider to be the plague of Minnesota waters for their destruction of habitat used by game fish, waterfowl and other wildlife, were imported to North America from Europe in about 1870.

• Proponents believed carp could be cultivated in ponds, as they were in Europe, yielding food for a growing nation. According to the National Park Service, the U.S. Commission of Fish and Fisheries, a forerunner to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, aggressively promoted carp cultivation nationwide, as did state fish commissions.

• What went wrong? Everything: Imported carp were not considered a delicacy here as they were in Europe. Worse, the carp’s seemingly unique ability to thrive and reproduce in almost any aquatic habitat, while muddying up waters needed by native vegetation and fish, soon made them persona non grata nationwide.

• Peter Sorensen, among other U researchers, hopes someday to eradicate, or at least better control, common carp in Minnesota. Until then, fractional percentages of the carp’s overall population fall each year to commercial harvest — and to bowfishermen.