Jim Souhan analyzes the local sports scene and advises you to never take his betting advice. He likes old guitars and old music, never eats press box hot dogs, and can be heard on 1500ESPN at 2:05 p.m. weekdays, and Sundays from 10 a.m.-noon.

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Posts about All-Stars and honors

Twins' trio does well

Posted by: Jim Souhan Updated: July 13, 2014 - 7:51 PM

When I visited Jose Berrios at Class A Fort Myers a month ago, he said he had two goals: To pitch in the Futures Game, and get called up to Class AA New Britain.

Sunday, he started and pitched one inning for the World Team in the Futures Game, striking out one while retiring the side in order, and he was recently called up to New Britain.

So what's next? ``Hope I can get called up to the big leagues,'' he said.

Berrios was just one of a dozen power arms that impressed USA manager Tom Kelly.

``Oh, my, it was relentless,'' he said. ``That was very impressive. One great arm after another. I went out to the mound to make a change, and I'm standing there talking to the infielders, saying, `Fellas, I don't know how anybody gets any hits today.' ''

Twins prospect Kennys Vargas played the whole game at first base for the World Team, hitting a double and striking out twice in four at-bats. Top pitching prospect Alex Meyer pitched one inning for the US. He threw four pitches, all clocked at about 97 mph, yielding a line out, a line single, and a double play.

``I went to write on the lineup card, and turned around, and he was coming in,'' Kelly said.

-----------------------

I'll be on 1500ESPN at 12:15 every weekday with Mackey&Judd. Thanks to everyone who came by the booth today at FanFest.

If you haven't picked up a copy of our All Star special section in the Sunday paper, please do. A lot of talented people put in a lot of work to make it special, and Patrick Reusse's story on Willie Mays is a must-read.

RIP Don Zimmer. Here's my piece on him from Yankee days

Posted by: Jim Souhan Updated: June 5, 2014 - 9:09 AM

In 1999, I spent a few days in Kansas City doing a story on baseball lifer Don Zimmer, who passed away on Wednesday.

Here's the piece, from his days as the Yankees bench coach:

------

By Jim Souhan

Kansas City

His is the face of baseball, symmetrically seamed and smooth. His

has been a life of baseball, a Forrest Gumpian romp through the

game's history, his mementos ranging from a ball Babe Ruth signed

in 1947 to the ring he won in the House that Ruth Built 51 years

later.



   Don Zimmer earned Ruth's autograph when his American Legion team

won a national tournament. Zimmer, now the Yankees' interim manager

who will direct the defending World Series champions against the

Twins tonight to start a three-game series, played with that

precious artifact on the sandlots of hometown Cincinnati. He would

never again trifle with baseball history.



   "My wife keeps a scrapbook," he said this weekend, sitting in the

dugout in Kauffman Stadium. "We have a cupboard on the floor below

the trophy case. I would say that cupboard is probably as long as

from here to that wall," he says, pointing to the end of the

dugout, 10 feet away.



   "There are doors that open up here, here and here, and she's got

scrapbooks starting in 1948, when I was in high school, all the way

up 'til today. Somebody wants to see something about 1949, all they

have to do is pull it out."



   Zimmer's longevity reveals itself in a couple of his nicknames -

ranging from one of the original, crude, cartoons ("Popeye," given

to him as a young man for the size of his forearms) to a high-tech

special effect ("Yoda," for his posture and mentoring on the

Yankees' bench). His scrapbooks span the same timeline, from faded

black-and-white to florid color.



   "It's amazing what she's done, amazing," Zimmer said of his wife,

Jean, nicknamed "Soot." "I'll get my grand-kids in there and we'll

start looking at '55, '54, '56 when we wore those bloomers. Oh,

they start laughing. `Pops, you didn't really wear those kind of

uniforms, did you?' "



   Zimmer laughs, and those bright blue eyes that have seen

everything from Ruth's wizened grin to Jackie Robinson's glare to

Sandy Amoros' catch to Bucky Dent's homer to a Yankee team winning

125 games emerge from the cheeks and jowls.



   "That's all we wore," he says, laughing, the punch line more in

the delivery - leaning forward, eyes wide - than the line.



   Zimmer's baseball life has spanned from flannels to double-knits,

those tight-fitting pants that today reveal the outlines of a brace

wrapped around Zimmer's right knee. He's 68, and he might have both

knees replaced, which is why his days as interim manager might soon

end.



   Yankees owner George Steinbrenner begged him to run the team

while Zimmer's friend, Joe Torre, recovers from prostate cancer.

Zimmer has defiantly fought off Steinbrenner's meddling attempts,

which has been easy because he has nothing to fear - his knees hurt

so much a firing would be an act of mercy.



   He doesn't take the lineup to home plate or visit the mound to

change pitchers. All the miles he has traveled around the bases and

on buses, trains and planes, playing in a handful of countries and

for teams now defunct and forgotten, and suddenly a 90-foot stroll

is daunting.



   Wednesday, frustrated and pained, Zimmer told the Yankees players

he was "going home." Then Torre told him he couldn't return yet,

and Zimmer agreed to stay on indefinitely.



   When Torre returns, Zimmer will indeed "go home." He hasn't

committed to retirement or returning, only to spending time with

Soot and surgeons.



   "I've had a lot of people tell me, no big deal, I had it done,"

Zimmer said of knee replacement surgery. "I asked, `How long'd it

take?' Six months. I said, `That's nothing?' My days are numbered."



   Someone told Zimmer he might as well get both knees replaced.

"Very good," Zimmer said, nodding. "Put me to sleep and get it

done, and then I'll go dancing."



   And he laughs again, and runs a hand over the face that has

appeared in so many of baseball's climactic scenes, and sighs,

"What a life." It is neither complaint nor proclamation, just a

sigh from baseball's accidental tourist.



   .



   Hey Zimmah!



   Zimmer is sitting on the bench in Kansas City, and Yankees

shortstop Derek Jeter, 30 feet away, calls out "Zim-mah!"



   "You hear him call me that?" Zimmer says with a wink. "He's heard

me tell stories about Boston."



   Zimmer managed the Red Sox in 1978, when they blew a 14-game lead

to the Yankees, then forced the most infamous playoff in New

England history, when Dent's pop-fly homer cleared the Green Monster.



   "I'd take one step out of the dugout to go get the pitcher, and

it would be `You bleeping bum Zimmah!' " Zimmer said. " `You're a

bum! Pahk the cahr! You're still a bum!"



   Were those the toughest fans he has faced? "Well, it's very

easy," he said. "If there are 28,000 in the stands and 27,999 are

booing you, I guess that would be the spot."



   Was his wife the lone dissenter? "That's it," he said. "But

sometimes I think she was in there, too."



   He got booed again the first time he returned to Boston as the

Texas manager, on Opening Day at Fenway Park. Ralph Houk was the

Red Sox manager.



   "I bring out the lineup," he says. "My players are waiting

because they know I'm going to get booed. I take one step out . . .

`Booooo.' As soon as I got to home plate I took my hat off [he

doffs it]. That's when I said to the umpire, `Tough town. Here's

Mr. Ralph Houk, The General, war hero, and people are booing him."



   With Zimmer, there's not only a tongue-in-cheek story, there's

the story behind the story.



   He didn't just get victimized by Dent's homer - he later rented

Dent's house - and called Dent to tell him he was taking all the

pictures of his famous home run and turning them to face the walls.



   He not only played for perhaps the worst team in history - the

first-year Mets - he served as the bench coach for perhaps the best

- last year's Yankees.



   Zimmer didn't just marry his high school sweetheart, he held his

wedding on the baseball diamond at Elmira in 1951 and his wedding

party strolled under a calliope of crossed bats.



   He was in the dugout when Don Larsen pitched his perfect game,

and in the third base coaching box when Pete Rose, playing third

base for the Reds in the '75 World Series, said, "Zim, I don't know

who is going to win this game, but it might be the greatest game

I've ever played in," and then Carlton Fisk waived his home-run fair.



   He is the last member of the Dodgers who won the World Series in

Brooklyn who's still in uniform, just as he is the last of the

original Mets still active.



   He hasn't earned any money outside baseball his entire life,

except for the one social security check he cashed in '95, when he

thought he was retired. Then Torre called, and the two scripted two

World Series championships.



   His first major league at-bat? A triple off Curt Simmons. His

first American League at-bat? A two-run homer for the Washington

Senators. His first game with the Cubs? A homer off Don Drysdale at

the Los Angeles Coliseum.



   He can take credit for the only World Series the Brooklyn Dodgers

ever won, because Amoros replaced him in the lineup and made maybe

the most famous catch in Brooklyn history.



   One Opening Day at Wrigley, when Zimmer was managing the Cubs,

Mitch (Wild Thing) Williams frightened the faithful before securing

a save, just as he had the previous Opening Day.



   A writer and Zimmer were sitting in Zimmer's office when a TV

crew came in, asking about Deja Vu. Zimmer gave a perfunctory

answer, the crew left, and Zimmer asked the writer, "What's all

this about Ronja Vu? Why don't they ask me about the game?"



   .



   Search engine



   Zimmer doesn't follow baseball's mythical and omniscient "book."

What's the use of spending a life studying baseball, then using a

crib sheet on the test?



   He has hit-and -run with the bases loaded. He walked Kent Hrbek

with a one-run lead in the ninth and nobody on.



   "He was on a home run streak," Zimmer once said. "The next guy

was a good hitter - I forget who - but I didn't want Hrbek to tie

the score. The next guy hits a two-run homer . . . I'm fired."



   But the pitcher came through.



   "It took me a year more to get fired," he said.



   "He was the best manager I ever played for," said Red Sox manager

Jimy Williams, who played for Zimmer in the minors. "He's an

old-school guy - who can communicate."



   One time Yankees right fielder Paul O'Neill popped out, then

started tossing bats and helmets. Zimmer went to him, and O'Neill

yelled, "That's it, Zim, I quit, I'm going home."



   Zimmer put on his Yoda face and said, "That's good, we're both

from Cincinnati, I got a guy in the cement-block business who can

give you a job."



   When Zimmer's status was in doubt last week, O'Neill said, "What,

is Zimmer going home to take my job?"



   Twins bullpen coach Rick Stelmaszek, a Chicago guy, never got to

know Zimmer well. "But my Mom did," Stelmaszek said. "She works at

the OTB."



   Ah, off-track betting - Zimmer's second-favorite type of betting,

right behind on-track betting. Once, when Zimmer was in a previous

incarnation as a Yankees coach, he told writers he had experienced

the best day of his life. He had visited three tracks in one day.



   He was asked how much money he had won, to make it the best day

ever. "Nothin'!" he said. "But I got to bet on 37 races!"



   In early April, the trumpeter Chuck Mangione appeared as a guest

on a Cubs broadcast.



   After he played that fanfare heard before every horse race,

Mangione said, "Every time I play that at Yankee Stadium, Zim

levitates off the bench."



   .



   Saintly days



   There's a remote chance Torre could replace Zimmer this week,

raising the possibility Zimmer's last days in uniform could come in

Minneapolis, 46 years after the Brooklyn Dodgers thought their

successor to Pee Wee Reese had played his last game in St. Paul.



   In 1953, Zimmer was playing for the St. Paul Saints, a Dodgers'

farm club, and leading the American Association with 23 homers when

he was beaned.



   He went into a coma for two weeks. His season was over.



   "And then the next year, I got to go back to St. Paul, because

the Dodgers have to see if I can play, if I'm afraid of the ball,"

Zimmer said. "Real quick I hit 17 homers, and I got called to the

Dodgers and stayed."



   In '56, he had his cheekbone fractured by Hal Jeffcoat in

Cincinnati. He missed the rest of that season, too. Two beanings,

and his promise as a future star faded. He once stole home 10 times

in a minor league season, but never got to recreate those heroics

in the majors.



   He outlasted Reese, but lost the shortstop job to Maury Wills.



   With more luck, Zimmer could have been a star, could have become

part of the Dodgers' pantheon with Campy, Hodges, Reese, Snider.



   Zimmer treats regrets the way he has treated tobacco chaws,

spitting them anywhere there aren't white shoes. This weekend, as

he limped about and told stories, someone asked Zimmer if he has

spent time thinking about his life in baseball.



   "Tremendous," he says, those eyes emerging again. "Tre-men-dous.

How lucky can a guy be, to be in the game all of his life?



   "It boils down to this: Anything and everything I have I owe to

baseball. I owe the game everything. I've had a great ride."



   .



   .



   Donald William Zimmer



   - Age: 68



   - Birthplace: Cincinnati



   - Residence: Treasure Island, Fla.



   - Married: Jean Carol Bauerle (nickname: Soot)



   - Teams played for: Brooklyn Dodgers, Los Angeles Dodgers

(twice), Chicago Cubs, New York Mets, Cincinnati Reds, Washington

Senators, Toei Flyers (Japan)



   - Teams coached for: Yankees (three times), Boston (twice),

Giants, Rockies, Cubs, Expos



   - Managed: Padres, Red Sox, Rangers, Cubs, Yankees (interim)



   - Managerial record: 885-858



   - Notable: Stole home 10 times in one minor league season. . . .

Hit 23 homers for the St. Paul Saints in 1953 before being beaned,

and he hit 17 homers for the St. Paul Saints in 1954 before being

called up to the Brooklyn Dodgers. . . . Career .235 major league

hitter, as he so often reminds people.



   - Plans: "Going home," meaning he will go to his home in New

York, visit his grandchildren, probably have knee surgery and

recuperate. It might also mean retirement, but nobody knows for

sure but Zimmer - and maybe Soot.
 

Morneau almost beaned

Posted by: Jim Souhan Updated: September 4, 2013 - 11:31 PM

Justin Morneau, a former hockey player, wore what looked like a hockey number and almost got into a brawl on Wednesday night.

Morneau donned No. 66 because the Pirates have retired his traditional No. 33, which belonged to the great Honus Wagner. He came to the plate after Andrew McCutchen hit a home run to left field and didn't run hard to first base.

Brewers pitcher Wily Peralta thought McCutchen was showing hhim up. McCutchen said he lost track of the ball. Morneau seemed to pay for the difference of opinion.

Peralta's next pitch almost hit Morneau in the head. Morneau took the pitch off his shoulder or forearm. Morneau motioned in anger and bewilderment, and the benches and dugouts emptied, although there were no punches thrown.

I asked Morneau if he took offense to that pitch. ``That's an interesting way to phrase it,'' Morneau said. ``It's one of those things where you're not sure. Is it a coincidence that it happened after a home run, or not? It's hard to say. If I hadn't hit the ball hard the other way the first two times I really would have been mad. I believe in pitching inside. The only thing that really gets you is when you get up around that head area, and that's what I took exception to.

``Getting hit is part of the game. When you get up in that danger zone, that's when I think tempers will get a little flared. They said they didn't do it on purpose, so...''

Morneau took note of his teammates rushing to his defense. ``That's a lose-lose situation for us,'' he said. ``I go out there (to the mound) and we get someone hurt or get someone suspended and we're missing guys in a playoff race. You don't go, then you have to let them know that that's not all right, but what do you do? I think it's kind of selfish if you charge the mound in that situation, where you can hurt the team.

``It's strange to say sometimes, but sometimes when crazy things happen that really brings a team together.''

-----------

I spent three days in Milwaukee following former Twins Morneau and Francisco Liriano. Liriano pitched poorly Wednesday but has salvaged his career. Morneau, while saddened by the way his tenure with the Twins ended, looks thrilled to be playing meaningful games in September again.

Remember, because of injuries, Morneau has played in only two playoff series, and in seven games - in '04 and '06.

I now have a team to watch in September and October. Morneau is one of the best people I've covered in baseball, and I love the Pirates' story. The lifelong baseball fan in me would love to see him fully recovered from the concussion symptoms that threatened his career, and leading the Pirates to their first World Series title since 1979.

More Morneau from Milwaukee

Posted by: Jim Souhan Updated: September 3, 2013 - 8:38 PM

Had a long talk with Justin Morneau that provided the basis for today's column. I couldn't fit all the good stuff into the newspaper, so here are Morneua's responses on a few other topics of interest:

Do you leave the Twins bearing a few regrets?

Morneau: ``Yeah. A World Series would have been the No. 1 thing. We got to theplayoffs and couldn’t find a way to get it done. It seemed like a key player was injured every time we got there, and when you’re matching up with a team like the Yankees that has so much depth, you need every guy that you have. In '06 we’re missing Frankie (Liriano), who was the best pitcher in the game at the time. And then in '09 and '10 I was hurt, and who knows what happens? I couldn't control the injuries. It’s part of playing the game. That’s something you wish didn’t happen but that’s part of the game.''

What was it like to be traded and wind up walking into the Pirates' dugout during a game?

Morneau: Crazy. Crazy. Really weird. For a few innings I looked out there, being on a different team, it took a little while to settle in. Once I made a few plays and atook a couple of at-bats, it started to sink in, and I started to realize it’s still baseball. Different team, but still baseball. It’s odd. At the same time, it was exciting.

Was it anything like being called up as a rookie?
 
Morneau: Completely different. I remember when I was a rookie. I had the benefit for being called up at the beginning of the season when I was swinging the bat well, so I had a lot of confidence going in. I don’t really remember being that nervous the first at-bat. I got up at 4 a.m. and flew out at 6, went to hotel for an hour then came to ballpark. I was so young I didn’t have time to really realize what was going on .There was a lot of adrenaline going through the system on Sunday, because I was going on limited sleep for a couple of days. That helped a lot.
 
Were you worried about a trade?
 
Morneau: Anticipating would be the right word. I thought something might happen. (Twins GM) Terry Ryan was nice enough to tell me the night before that something might happen the next day. I was just sitting there waiting, hopped on a plane, went to the park. Just craziness.
 
Did you and Terry have a chance to talk?
 
Morneau: Yeah. He was the GM when I was drafted. I’ve been there since he was GM, then gone, then GM gm, and he was gone, and GM again. It’s a long relationship. He’s the guy that’s always been honest with me and had my best interests in mind through all the good times and the injuries.
 
Did your family come to Milwaukee?
 
Morneau: Everbody drove over. Grandma and Grandpa drove the kids over. It’s good to see them because I don't know how much I’ll see them in the next month. That stuff is the most difficult. The baseball stuff, you know, once I learn all my teamamtes’ names, that stuff will be the easy part of it. The tough part of it will be being away from the family and the kds and staying in a hotel for a couple of months.
 

Can you see yourself playing for the Twins again?

Morneau: I’ll cross that bridge when I get to it. That’s too hard to answer that right now.

What was your favorite moment as a Twin? Maybe the game-winning home run off Detroit reliever Joel Zumaya in 2006? 

Morneau: That one went through my head. The favorite one for me would probably be sitting in the dome the last day of the season in 2006, watching the game in Kansas City up on the screen, when nobody left the stadium. That’s not something you could ever script or plan. That just kind of happened. That was something we all shared with the fans and our teammates. That was insanity. That was probably my favorite thing I can think of.

 

Did you consider retiring when you were dealing with concussion symptoms?

Morneau: I had to think about it, but to say it was considered, no. To say it was close, no. But was it a realistic possibility? Maybe. It’s hard to say. Going through it, it felt like I wasn’t getting better. If I physically wasn’t able to go out there, to be cleared by a doctor to play…

Will you still live in the Twin Cities?

Morneau: Well, we live in Arizona during the winter. Corey Koskie came back. It might turn out to be a good thing. You go somewhere else and see what it's like, and you realize how great the Twin Cities are.

You've started hitting homers like your old self in the last month. Have you found your swing?

Morneau: My swing felt more like my swing. It's hard to put a finger on it. Those pitches I was missing or popping up early in the year, I felt like I was squaring up. I hit them in some of the right ballparks to hit them in, too. I just hope it continues for this month and next month and we have some fun.

Do you have any reassessed career goals? 

Morneau: Winning. Just winning. Hopefully I get to play a few more years and enjoy wherever I'm at. Right now this is a good place to be.

---------------------------------------

I'll be on 1500ESPN at noon tomorrow from Milwaukee. Sunday on the station we'll have the Gardenhire show from 9:30-10, then Sunday Sports Talk with me, Scott Korzenowski and Tom Linnemann from 10-noon. I'll be calling in from the Vikings game in Detroit.

Mauer's value

Posted by: Jim Souhan Updated: July 31, 2013 - 9:08 AM

Everytime I write something nice or even neutral on Joe Mauer, I get emails. Oh, I get emails. Mostly from people telling me he's overpaid.

Well, if he is overpaid, it's not by much.

There are two ways of assessing a veteran player's monetary value. One is anecdotal. Talk to people in the game. They said Mauer would have made a killing as a free agent had he become one. Can you imagine what the Red Sox would have paid for a potential Hall of Fame catcher in his prime with a swing that might produce 50 doubles a year off the Green Monster, and who would constantly be on base in front of their sluggers? Probably $25 million a year. And all quality free agents end up being paid more than their actual value, because the bidding becomes a competition between super powers.

So Mauer is certainly worth $23 million anecdotally.

In terms of statistical valuation, I always turn to the great site Fangraphs.com, which calculates the obective value of a player.

Here is how Fangraphs values Mauer, year by year, since 2006: $23.1 million, $12.7 million, $26.6 million, $34.5 million, $21 million, $6.1 million and $21.2 million. This year, he is valued, so far, at $21.5 million.

Obviously, when he doesn't stay on the field, he's not worth the money, which is why 2011 was such an abomination.

When he is on the field, he's worth about what the Twins are paying him. Factor in that the Twins signed him in part to keep his contract status from ruining the opening season at Target Field, and he was an incredible bargain from 2006 through 2009, and the Twins and their fans have little to complain about other than the mystery ailments of 2011.

Mauer's real problem is he plays for a bad team. He doesn't have people on base ahead of him, and he doesn't have people who can drive him in batting behind him. He's not as valuable as Miguel Cabrera, but he's more valuable than the great majority of players with big-money contracts.

He's also the Twins' only above-average position player. He's not the guy you should be complaining about.

-----------------------

I'll be on 1500ESPN at noon with Judd & Dubay. Please follow me on Twitter at @Souhanstrib.

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