Major league games slow to a crawl

  • Article by: DENNIS BRACKIN , Star Tribune
  • Updated: June 9, 2013 - 12:22 AM

The Twins are pretty much like every other team, as the average nine-inning game has increased from 2:46 in 2005 to 2:51 in 2008 to 2:56 in 2012 to 2:58 — three hours in the American League —this season.

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Twins Ron Gardenhire has beaten a path to the pitcher’s mound this season. The staff is still looking for its first complete game of 2013.

Photo: File photo by Charles Krupa • Associated Press,

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Baseball romantics wax poetic about their game being the only American professional sport with no time clock. But with major league games increasingly stretching beyond 3½ hours, the romance is being tested. ¶ “Brutal” is the way ex-Twin, current fan Kent Hrbek describes this year’s games. ¶ The Twins are on their way to being the slowest, most deliberate team in franchise history, with an average game time of over three hours for the first time ever. They have already played seven nine-inning games of at least 3 hours, 30 minutes, which projects to 20 over a full season — the Twins record is 10. ¶ Only eight seasons ago, in 2005, the Twins led the majors with an average of 2:37 a game. Every year since 1999, they beat the major league average. ¶ Now the Twins are pretty much like every other team, as the average nine-inning game has increased from 2:46 in 2005 to 2:51 in 2008 to 2:56 in 2012 to 2:58 — three hours in the American League — this season.

 

Why? The answers are complex and varied, some specific to certain teams, such as the Twins and their nightly parade of pitchers jogging in from the bullpen. Other factors — among them hitters constantly stepping out of the batter’s box and pitchers dawdling — are common to every team.

Bob Watson, who was in charge of monitoring the pace of games as baseball’s vice president of rules and on-field operations until his retirement in 2010, is disappointed in the recent uptick.

“I think the thing right now with MLB, no one’s focusing on it like when I was sitting in the chair,” Watson said last week. “You’ve got to stay on top of it.”

A major league spokesman said times continue to be closely monitored. Another league, meanwhile, is taking real steps.

The independent Atlantic League is experimenting this season with ways to speed up games. Its most significant changes are merely enforcing existing rules for the high strike (midpoint between shoulders and belt); keeping hitters in the box; and making sure pitchers deliver the ball within 12 seconds with no runners on base after a batter is set. Early results show that that has shaved 10 to 15 minutes off last year’s average game time, which was on a par with the majors.

If Atlantic League President Peter Kirk needed affirmation, it came Thursday when he and his son were at Fenway Park for Boston’s 6-3 victory over Texas, a 3-hour, 21-minute affair. The score was tied 3-3 in the seventh inning, but it was closing in on 10 p.m. The Kirks were so tired they left, missing a walk-off homer by David Ortiz.

“Those are the choices you have to make,’’ Kirk said.

Back in the day

Major league games averaged 2 hours, 30 minutes during the 1970s and early 1980s, an era Twins manager Ron Gardenhire refers to as “back in the day.’’ Marathon games were almost nonexistent — between 1966 and 1984, the Twins played a total of six games that lasted 3:30 or more, or one fewer than they’ve already played this season.

It was an era before almost every game was televised; before taking pitches became an integral part of offensive strategy; and before pitch counts and the specialization of bullpens.

In the era preceding widespread TV games, teams could be on and off the field every half-inning in 90 seconds. But by 1990, locally televised games were given 2:05 for breaks, and nationally televised games 2:25.

Gardenhire says players, particularly pitchers, know there’s no rush, so they stroll onto the field, with pitchers taking a casual approach in warmups. During a recent Twins game that was televised locally, the time between the final out in a half-inning and the ensuing first pitch was regularly between 2:20 and 2:30.

“We have pitchers waiting in the dugout [to take field],” Gardenhire said. “So many of the TV games, you’re waiting around.”

That probably won’t change. Those mandatory breaks allow for the money-making commercials that are a financial lifeline.

But there’s a lot more to longer games than TV. The difference between current 2:05 breaks for local TV and 90-second breaks of the 1970s is about 10 minutes a game, and the average game is 30 minutes longer.

Why? Starting pitchers seldom pitch complete games anymore — 28 percent of starts were complete games in 1971, compared to 3 percent in 2012 — and each pitching change adds time, especially in the American League where, because of the DH, it tends to come during play.

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Cincinnati - WP: A. Simon 4 FINAL
Chicago Cubs - LP: J. Samardzija 1
St. Louis - LP: M. Wacha 1 FINAL
Washington - WP: G. Gonzalez 3
Milwaukee 5 Top 9th Inning
Pittsburgh 3
Toronto 3 Top 9th Inning
Cleveland 2
LA Angels 11 Bottom 7th Inning
Detroit 3
Atlanta 5 Top 9th Inning
NY Mets 0
Baltimore 7 Bottom 7th Inning
Boston 4
NY Yankees 5 Bottom 7th Inning
Tampa Bay 3
Seattle 4 Bottom 8th Inning
Miami 4
Chicago WSox 0 Top 6th Inning
Texas 10
Minnesota 0 Bottom 6th Inning
Kansas City 3
Philadelphia 0 Bottom 4th Inning
Colorado 7
Houston - J. Cosart 9:05 PM
Oakland - S. Gray
San Francisco - M. Cain 9:10 PM
San Diego - T. Ross
Arizona - W. Miley 9:10 PM
Los Angeles - Z. Greinke
Montreal 4 FINAL
Tampa Bay 1
Detroit 1 3rd Prd 1:46
Boston 0
Dallas 9:00 PM
Anaheim
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