Ron Hustvedt

Ron Hustvedt is an outdoors writer and photographer who covers a broad array of experiences, individuals and events centered on hunting and fishing. He is also a professional educator. Please visit his website at www.WriteOutdoors.com.

Posts about Outdoors Women

Today's woman proudly defines how she enjoys the outdoors and presents herself

Posted by: Ron Hustvedt Updated: February 19, 2013 - 9:38 PM

 

 

             “We Can Do It!” blares across the top of the famous poster from World War II featuring a woman flexing her arm in the rolled up sleeve of a blue denim work shirt.

            That image is a caricature known as “Rosie the Riveter” and she turned 70-years old last week reminding us of how far things have come. Her likeness adorns the wall of my three-year-old daughters bedroom as well as a refrigerator magnet in our kitchen. “Girls can do anything,” is what my daughter thinks it says and I couldn’t agree with her more.
During WWII, women were needed to fill vacancies left by men who were off to combat in the Pacific and Europe. Women were mobilized in a similar fashion during World War I but to a much lesser extent. After WWII the women were expected to return to the home but many had experienced a freedom they didn’t want to lose again.
            Over the past seven decades a woman’s role in society has changed vastly but there are still elements where they are greatly under represented. The outdoors is a prime example.
            Women like Rebecca Kent and Mercedes Akinseye are among a group in Minnesota working to change that. The group is known as, “Women Hunting and Fishing in All Seasons,” and its members call themselves a group of women and girls who love to be outdoors and want to get others out there as well. “Our mission is to increase hunting and fishing participation by Minnesota women of all ages and backgrounds through education, inspiration and empowerment,” Kent said.
            Kent is a recent college graduate who spent part of her undergraduate studies working with the DNR to study the reasons women aren’t participating in the outdoors as much as men. She interviewed women to find out the barriers that prevent them from getting outdoors and what opportunities could be presented to increase those numbers.  
            Kent and Akinseye recently spent a weekend up in Bemidji filming ice-fishing segments for a series of videos showing women ice fishing and talking about how other women can have similar experiences. Those videos will eventually end up on the group’s Facebook page (www.facebook.com/WHFIS) and website (www.womenhfs.org). 

            Local fishing guide and promotional angler Bryan “Beef” Sathre of Fathead Guide Service and Promotions worked with the two showing them a few of his favorite hotspots. “Beef was great at letting us do our own thing like we wanted but he was a valuable asset to narrowing down our search and putting us on some solid bites,” Kent said. 
On Saturday, Kent and Akinseye spent the day fishing three different Bemidji-area lakes eventually catching six different species. It was a non-traditional “women’s-weekend” but that’s exactly what we set out to do, Akinseye said.
“We stayed at the Hampton Inn here in town and it’s a very nice hotel with all the modern accommodations—but we spent the day on the lake rather than in the spa, salon or shopping,” Kent said. “That’s what we went up there to do and wouldn’t have it any other way.”
 
Bemidji is loaded with those amenities as well but the pair chose the location because the outdoors opportunities are plentiful and very accessible. From their room overlooking the lake they could see thousands of shelters dotting the ice, some within a stone’s throw of the Hampton lobby.
            “We had a beautiful day on the ice. We were always comfortable and warm in our pop-up shelter,” Akinseye said. “The fishing was steady as well and we caught some good keepers for the dinner table later on.”
            After a day on the ice, they still managed to find time to relax in the hotel’s indoor-outdoor hot tub—a welcome rest after a day of drilling holes and hauling fish through the ice. “It was great to get back from a fun day on the ice, hang up our gear to dry and head to the restaurant for a drink and dinner,” Akinseye said.
            It was a weekend any Rosie the Riveter might have enjoyed after a long week of working—something most women today are doing already, compared to seven decades ago. The difference today is that a woman is the driver of her own destiny. The decisions are hers to make.
            “You can still preserve those things that make you a woman while doing other things you want to that used to be considered just for men,” Akinseye said. On the ice the attire was function over fashion with red StrikeMaster bib overalls, boots and a hearty coat but there was plenty of traditional femininity mixed in. 
            “I like to keep my nails looking nice and I always put on make-up before going fishing,” Akinseye said. “It’s not like I’m trying to impress anybody, and the fish don’t care. I do it for myself.”
            That image on that famous Rosie the Riveter poster is similar to Akinseye in that it features a woman who obviously works hard but also has make-up on her face. The main difference is that in the 1940s, a man painted the image expecting women to be tough while also maintaining her looks for his sake.
            Today, a woman can decide how she’ll look, for whom she’ll look good for, and what she does for fun. Being tough is just who she is for her own sake, not to mention when battling a scrappy walleye. 
 

Opportunities abound for discovering the outdoors if you just express an interest and apply

Posted by: Ron Hustvedt Updated: January 30, 2013 - 11:10 PM
Most of us outdoors types had an influential person in our lives who introduced us to the outdoors and helped ignite, not just our interest in the outdoors, but also provided us with guidance. Chances are it was more than one person and probably at different times in our outdoor experiences.
            The world we live in today is distinctly different from that of just a generation ago and there’s a definite need for people to serve as mentors. Numerous hunters and anglers have put themselves out there to serve this role but they need youth and adults interested in having a mentor.
            It’s an interesting dynamic. You find out about people who need mentoring, so you find mentors. They connect and a new group of people learn the joy of the outdoors. This in turn spurns others to sign up for a mentored hunt and others to mentor.
            That said, the effort to recruit mentors must also be matched with the effort to recruit mentees. Mike “Cold Front” Kurre, mentoring program coordinator at the DNR, recently told me that they are looking for first-time youth and a supporting adult to apply for a mentored youth spring turkey hunt.
            The deadline for this hunt is coming soon on February 19 and application information can be found at www.dnr.state.mn.us/harr/youth/turkey/index.html
            This hunt is in conjunction with the National Wild Turkey Federation and intended to be an educational experience for new turkey hunters, both youth and their guardian. Only the youth is eligible to shoot but both the youth and adult will go with a mentor to hunt.
            To be eligible, a youth must be between the ages of 12 and 17 by April 20, possess a Firearms Safety Certificate and have a parent, guardian, or authorized adult accompany the youth. The youth must also be a “first-time” turkey hunter.
            If you are interested, go to the link above and sign-up. If you think you’d like to be a mentor down the road, contact Kurre at Michael.Kurre@state.mn.us or 651-259-5193.
            Another equally fantastic opportunity exists for women over 18 interested in learning turkey hunting skills and participating in a mid-May turkey hunt. The area of the hunt this spring is limited to Hugo in the northeast metro area. The application can be downloaded at http://files.dnr.state.mn.us/fish_wildlife/outreach/mentoring/adult/women_turkey.pdf with an application deadline of February 19.
            These are certainly not the only opportunities available for mentors and folks new to the outdoors. A complete run down of programs can be found at www.dnr.state.mn.us/fishwildlife/outreach/index.html or contacting Kurre.
Another great resource is the "Women Hunting and Fishing in all Seasons" work group which can be accessed online at www.womenhfs.org.
            If you have been on one of these mentored hunts either as a mentor or mentee, please post your stories in the comments section below. 

One of first two women paddlers who made journey to Hudson Bay making two appearances this week

Posted by: Ron Hustvedt Updated: November 25, 2012 - 3:29 PM
 
       Meet and chat with Natalie Warren, one of the first two women to paddle the 2,000-mile journey from Minneapolis to Hudson Bay. Hear first hand the trials and tribulations they experienced on this expedition of epic proportions.
         Warren will be sharing these stories at two locations this week sharing the details of the expedition, displaying photographs from the journey and talking about upcoming adventures.
         This Tuesday, November 27th at 5:30 p.m., Warren will be at the University of Minnesota in Hudson Hall Room 495 located at 516 Delaware St. SE, Minneapolis.
         Then on Wednesday, November 28th, Warren will be at Midwest Mountaineering in the Cedar-Riverside neighborhood of Minneapolis beginning at 7 p.m.
       The duo completed the journey from May to September 2011 and I had the honor of covering their expedition for the Star Tribune and Outdoor News. Both women are very interesting to chat with and are great storytellers.
         Their trip was nominated for Canoe and Kayak’s 2012 Expedition of the Year. Folks who are interested in adventuring, canoeing, and individuals accomplishing their dreams would greatly enjoy either of these presentations.
         For more details, including the complete blog they wrote while on their journey (complete with photos), visit their website at www.hudsonbaybound.com.
 
Raiho looks out over Lake Winnipeg, a massive waterbody they crossed on their journey

Raiho looks out over Lake Winnipeg, a massive waterbody they crossed on their journey

Olympic medalist Kim Rhode no stranger to Minnesota

Posted by: Ron Hustvedt Updated: July 30, 2012 - 12:18 AM

             It’s too bad the shooting sports and archery don’t receive a more prominent position in Olympic coverage but it’s hard to avoid that this year with the United States teams doing so well.

            The men’s archery team took silver and skeet shooter Kim Rhode took home Olympic gold. She did so in a record-setting performance far surpassing her competition. Her score of 99 out of 100 was near perfect and a full eight targets better than the second place finisher.
            She also has accomplished something no other Olympiad has ever done—she has won five medals in five consecutive Olympics. Carl Lewis never did that nor did Jackie Joyner-Kersee.
            It’s a testament to the fact that archery and shooting are truly life sports. You can pick up the sport as a youth and continue it as a senior. Rhode won her first medal as a teenager and good friends of mine, Chuck and Loral I Delaney, are still avid shooters in their 70s.
            Those two stories converged back in 2006 when Kim Rhode spent the two weekends of Game Fair as a guest of Chuck and Loral I Delaney during the 25th Anniversary of the event.
The Delaney’s are strong advocates of the shooting sports and extremely accomplished shotgunners themselves. Loral I puts on shooting lessons for ladies at Game Fair each year and as an inductee into the national trapshooting hall of fame she’s definitely qualified. Go to http://www.traphof.org/Inductees/Delaney-Loral-I.html for details on some of her accomplishments (though not all).
            Rhode split her duties between the shotgun range providing instruction with Loral I and meeting with fans in the Information Tent. She was a very interesting woman to chat with and was very humble for a three-time Olympic athlete (at the time).
            I interviewed her for a profile that appeared in the Outdoor News and, all humility aside, she did sign an autograph for me and allowed me to check out her Olympic medals. It was impressive at the time but even moreso now that she’s the only individual Olympic athlete to win medals in five straight Olympics.
            What impresses me most about her shooting accomplishments was that she had to totally change her shooting style. Her first Olympic medals were achieved in trapshooting. Then they dropped that from the Olympics and she had to make the shift to skeet.
Kim Rhode and Loral I Delaney taught women shooting skills at Game Fair during her visit.

Kim Rhode and Loral I Delaney taught women shooting skills at Game Fair during her visit.

            I much prefer skeet to trap and, as anybody who shoots both will attest to, making the shift between them is a difficult adjustment.  The targets fly very differently and the rhythm is definitely a change.
            No word yet if she’ll be returning to Minnesota to visit the Delany’s at Game Fair again this year. Game Fair runs from August 10 to 12 and 17 to 19 at the Armstrong Ranch Kennels in Ramsey, MN and Olympic closing ceremonies are scheduled for August 12.
            If she does by chance happen to stop by, you can find out at www.facebook.com/GameFairUSA or on Twitter @GameFairUSA. Details on Game Fair can be found at www.GameFair.com
Rhode chatted with then Governor Tim Pawlenty who visited the 25th Game Fair to deliver a Proclamation.

Rhode chatted with then Governor Tim Pawlenty who visited the 25th Game Fair to deliver a Proclamation.

Something for everyone at Game Fair

Posted by: Ron Hustvedt Updated: August 4, 2011 - 12:01 AM
The 30th annual Game Fair is worth a visit!

The 30th annual Game Fair is worth a visit!

 

The 30th annual Game Fair is only a week away and this year is looking to be another great one, if not the best one yet. Nearly two million people have visited the Game Fair over the years with about 50,000 a year for the last decade or so. Make plans to be there as the show runs from August 12-14 and 19-21. 

I’ve been attending the Game Fair every year for the past 15 years and have been helping run the show out there the past five years. It’s a great event and the hosts of Game Fair, Chuck and Loral I Delaney, are a class act who are simply amazing. The amount of time and energy they put into hosting the event is phenomenal.

Almost all of the usual fan favorites will be there this year once again and there will be plenty of new things to see as well. This includes exhibitors, dog events, shooting events, archery courses, concessions and plenty of people watching.

One of the great things about Game Fair is that it’s a full family participation event. Bring the dog on a leash and walk around one of the few venues where dogs are more than just allowed, they are invited.

Bring the kids too and have your kids bring a few friends. There are so many kid events to keep them busy and having fun. The event is centered around hunting, but I have a lot of friends who go there every year and they don’t hunt. When I ask them why they go, their answer is that it’s fun to bring the dog and their kids always beg them to go every year.

Tough to beat that!

Located just outside of Anoka on Highway 10 and Armstrong Boulevard, the Game Fair grounds are simply gorgeous. There are 80 acres of oak trees, lush grass, wetlands and a good-sized lake.

One of the benefits of working at Game Fair, that even exhibitors are aware of, is how wild the grounds are when the fair isn’t going on. During the early morning hours the ducks are on the lake, sandhill cranes usually pay a visit, deer are not an uncommon sight and a ton of different species of birds.

Oh sure, they are all close by during the fair and often are seen by the lucky ones who can pull their attention away from all the fair events. With shotgun shooting exhibitions by Tom Knapp, dogs jumping off docks and cruising through obstacle courses, informational seminars and great new products to look at, the wildlife around you can be easily missed.

Fine art and taxidermy are also found at Game Fair. I spoke with Chris Knutson of Art Barbarians in Rogers, MN and he said his booth in the Art Barn will be a busy place as usual. “We’ll have Jim Hautman here the first Saturday of the fair. Scot Storm will be hanging out every day along with Bret Longley on both Saturdays and Sundays.”

For those who don’t know, Jim Hautman is a four-time and current winner of the Federal duck stamp. He’ll be doing demonstrations and chatting with visitors to the booth. Scot Storm is a great guy who I’ve had the privilege of interviewing. He is a phenomenal wildlife artist and winner of this year’s pheasant stamp. Storm and Longley will be doing painting demonstrations as well.

Something that doesn’t get talked about enough is the charitable nature of the Delaneys. They donate a lot to various organizations in the community and non-profits in the community are invited to utilize the Game Fair as a way of fundraising.

National and state conservation organizations are also beneficiaries of the Delaneys and Game Fair. Pheasants Forever has run their “Build a Wildlife Area” fundraiser out of Game Fair since its inception nine years ago and the Delaney’s have given generously to that cause over the years.

This year Federal Ammunition’s new pink shotshells will be available for those participating in the shotgun shooting events. Buy a box and make a donation to help find a cure for cancer.

Politics are tough to escape and Game Fair is no exception. A lot of Congressional representatives and both senators have a booth at the Game Fair along with the Secretary of State’s office. The Republicans and Democrats are both there showing their support of hunting and firearms along with several unions and labor organizations.

Even though it’s an off year for elections, there will be plenty of it to see and the organization “Sportsmen for Change” might even have a forum or two for people to chat with policy makers. I covered the gubernatorial debate last year at the Game Fair and have no doubt that as close as the election was, hearing from those folks firsthand regarding conservation issues probably swayed a few voters one way or the other and decided the election.

If you have never been out there, I encourage you to attend. Stop by the Information Booth and say hello to me (Ron Hustvedt). Say hello to Ron Schara (the “other Ron”). Say hello to Raven the black lab. Say hello to Chuck and Loral I Delaney.

For all the details about Game Fair 2011 go to www.gamefair.com

I’ve left out a lot of additional features of the Game Fair partially because any good blog shouldn’t be this long! The rest of it is for you all to fill in.

What’s your favorite part of Game Fair?

What are you looking forward to?

 

 

 

 

 

Time for annual ‘running of the bulls’ on your favorite bluegill lake

Posted by: Ron Hustvedt Updated: June 25, 2011 - 4:55 PM
True bull bluegill have that classic hump by their head

Some people don’t like it when bass are called “bucketmouths” or muskies are called “water tigers” but that’s a different argument for a different day. Those same folks might not like it that big bluegills are called “bulls” but I know how to change their mind.

Let them hook into one and try to battle it.

Big bluegills defy the term “panfish” because they exceed the size of your average pan. I’m talking trophy fish in the 10-inch and above range. The kind of bluegill that has a big bump on its head and looks almost freakish compared to the small ones that tend to hang out at every dock in the summertime.

"When these massive creatures turn sideways after a solid hook set, the term “bull” makes complete sense," said Bryan "Beef" Sathre of Fathead Guide Service in the Bemidji and Cass Lake area. Sathre is a bluegill trophy hunter who loves to tie into big bluegill, wrestle with them for awhile, snap a quick photo, then watch it swim away to fight another day.

"Pound for pound, bluegills are the toughest fish in the freshwater world. I tied into one the other day and swore I’d hooked into a pike until I got it closer to the boat," he said.

Right now is one of the best times around for catching big bluegill, Sathre said. That's because this is the time of the year when they are sitting on their beds and are extremely aggressive. It’s also the time of the year when they are at their most vulnerable state.Be sure to release that big bluegill to fight another day For that reason, if you go after these bull bluegills, please be sure to practice catch-photo-release. "If you want a meal of sweet-tasting bluegill fillets then keep a few smaller ones for the frying pan. Anything 10-inches or larger should quickly be released in my boat. It’s a good rule to consider in yours too," Sathre urged.

He fishes for them like they do for tarpon in coastal areas, "We’re sight fishing a lot of these bluegill locations. What I look for are transition points in the bottom in shallow bays and flats. My Costa del Mar polarized sunglasses help me find their nests that stand out as sandy holes." This is the result of the bluegill fanning out a nest that they guard very vigorously.

Another fantastic location is in the six to eight foot emerging cabbage beds or reeds adjacent to this deeper water. This is where they stage before spawning and hangout as they recover and is a fantastic secondary location. Big bluegill are a blast to catch "I’ll move in with the trolling motor until I’m 20 to 30 feet away and then cast to them with a slip bobber and small jig tipped with a waxworm or panfish leech. An ultra-light rod makes everything so much more fun and I really like the castability of the Bionic panfish line in four-pound test. It has low visibility but is strong enough to handle the largemouth, smallmouth, crappie, perch, pike and rock bass that are bound to hit your lure in these locations," Sathre said.

For lure selection, Sathre said he likes a 1/16th to 1/32nd firefly minnow or small jig. "If it’s windy I’ll go with the larger size. You don’t have to worry about spooking them with the cast or getting right on top of them. Get it close and they’ll come to you," he said.

Another great tactic is to go baitless and throw panfish Slurpies tubes on a float system. Case it up there, let the jig sink, reel it in a few feet, wait for the jig to catch up, pause, and repeat the process. Author with a high quality bluegill "Super pro bobbers from Northland Tackle do a great job in all conditions. If it’s windy then I use the weighted bobbers. Either way, balance the bobber so that you can detect a subtle bite. The other day I had it so my bobber was barely above the water making for very little resistance once a bluegill hit my jig," he said.

Where does Sathre pursue these massive bluegill? Most anywhere in the state has the potential for big bluegill waters. Around the metro they are a well guarded secret but go ahead and try asking your local baitshop. Lake Minnetonka or Waconia might be the best bed in the west metro while Bald Eagle Lake and the Mississippi River backwaters might be the best choice in the east metro.

"In my neck of the woods up here in Bemidji I like lakes such as Turtle River, Rabideau, Grace, Wolf, Andrusia, Grant, Irving and Blackduck," Sathre said.

Just remember to catch-photo-release these trophies so they can continue to raise the next generation of bulls.

Bryan Sathre with an impressive bluegill

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