Sue Kerfoot

In 1968, Sue married Bruce Kerfoot and moved from Chicago to the Gunflint Trail. They have run the Gunflint Lodge since then. As a novice northwoods resident, she has spent much of that time absorbing the rhythms of the local people and the nature world that make up the Gunflint Trail.

Gunflint Trail Now A National Scenic Byway

Posted by: Sue Kerfoot under Events, Outdoors Women Updated: October 17, 2009 - 8:34 AM
Yesterday, October 16, the Gunflint Trail was added to the list of National Scenic Byways.  There are only eight roads in Minnesota receiving this designation.  So what does it mean?  First of all it means that the Gunflint Trail is one of the prettiest roads in the state.  But it takes more than beauty to get listed.  Recognition is also given for the historic and recreational components of the Gunflint Trail.  Even those of us who live on the Trail are taking a new look as we drive along.  We always knew how lucky we are to live here but it is nice to have others recognize this too.  If you wish to get more information on the new listing, go to www.byways.org.

We have a young successful moose hunter on the Gunflint Trail.  This is 12-year-old Kelly Holmin from Nicollet, Minnesota.  She and her uncle got a moose license this year.  Kelly has been up two weekends hunting on the Trail.  On Thursday she was down in the Greenwood country walking in the woods looking for moose at about 3:00 p.m.  It had been a long day of walking.  This one appeared in a valley below her.  She took one shot at about 75 years.  It was a solid body shot.  The moose ran a bit while Kelly tried a second shot but missed.  Then the moose just collapsed and died.  The rack on this moose stretches for 58".  After pictures, the hard work began.  She and her father skinned and carted the moose to their vehicle with a little help from their ATV.  Unfortunately for reasons I don't understand Kelly's picture won't unload.

Greg Gecas from Heston's Resort told me an unofficial survey that he and a neighbor conducted for a few months this year.  Both men have been working outside installing wildfire suppression systems.  They noted when they saw loons flying and calling to each other.  With 24 hours, the weather changed from good to bad.  Over the course of a couple of months, they noted the calling loons five times.  After three times, the weather turned bad within 24 hours.  Greg firgured the loons had a better percentage of success than weathermen.  So take note the next time you see loons flying and calling.  What does the weather do the next day?

Speaking of weather, we are having a bit of cold weather up the Trail.  It has been staying in the low 30's and spitting some rain mixed with snow.  Something is wrong with this picture when we have green poplar leaves and snow on the ground.  It looks like today the sun is coming out. 
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