Conservation Corps: 'Resources restored, lives changed'

  • Article by: DOUG SMITH , Star Tribune
  • Updated: July 19, 2013 - 9:12 AM

More than 500 youths and young adults this year will serve in Conservation Corps Minnesota. The nonprofit group is following in the footsteps of the federal Civilian Conservation Corps, created in 1933 during the Great Depression.

view larger photos

  

 

Fifteen-year-old Brianna Thompson and 17-year-old Zoë Webb were knee-deep in a small, cold spring-fed stream in William O’Brien State Park, yanking out clumps of forget-me-nots, a pretty but problematic nonnative flowering plant blanketing the water and clogging it for native trout.

“I’ve seen people walk right into the stream not knowing it’s even there (because of the thick vegetation),’’ said Wayne Boerner, park manager, as he watched Thompson, Webb and seven other youths with Conservation Corps Minnesota uproot gobs of plants.

“This will really help this stream and allow trout to use it,’’ Boerner said.

The nine-member crew toiling at the park just north of the Twin Cities last week and their fellow crew members are among more than 500 youths and young adults, age 15 to 25, who this year will serve in Conservation Corps Minnesota. The nonprofit group is following in the footsteps of the federal Civilian Conservation Corps, created in 1933 during the Great Depression. Crews earn money, learn about the environment and improve the state’s natural resources — building trails, planting trees, and doing maintenance on public lands throughout the state.

Camped in tents at William O’Brien, the youths, clad in yellow hard hats and armed with saws and shears, also trimmed brush from trails, campsites and buildings at the park’s campground. Earlier in their four-week summer program, they worked on trails in Superior National Forest and St. Croix State Park.

They earned $190 a week while also getting work-skill training and environmental education.

“It’s not just a work program, it’s a youth development program,’’ said Cindy Green, a director with Conservation Corps. “They are taught how to write a résumé, interview and manage finances. They learn teamwork. They end up with a stronger work ethic, self esteem, communication skills and job-searching skills.’’

And they have fun. The youths and their two young adult leaders are immersed in the outdoors, camping the entire time.

“I love it,’’ said Webb, of Northfield. “It’s a great program. You learn how to work with other people, and the work we do is fun.’’

Said Thompson, of St. Paul: “The first hour we met, it was silent, but now we’re like family — we’re always happy and singing.’’

Thompson and Webb are members of a Conservation Corps program open to 15 to 18 year olds. Adult corps members 18 to 25 lead youth crews, build retaining walls, docks and other structures, do prescribed burns, fight fires and respond to disasters, sometimes in other states. More than 100 helped with cleanup in the aftermath of superstorm Sandy last year.

Those in the adult programs receive funding under the federal AmeriCorps program, including up to a $5,550 education award for year-round work and a $1,200 monthly stipend.

A win-win

This isn’t “make work,’’ said Len Price, executive director of the Conservation Corps. The crews fill a void.

“Our employees do some of this work, but we can’t handle the volume,’’ said Boerner, the park manager.

Said Price: “It’s a win-win deal. It’s a win for these kids and it’s a win for the people we work for and for our natural resources.’’

The program has grown since funding from the state ended in 2003 and the group became a nonprofit, said Price, a former state legislator. Agencies pay for the work and other revenue comes from the Legacy Amendment, the federal AmeriCorps program and donations. Last year, the program had a $7 million budget. The group has expanded into Iowa, thus its formal name: Conservation Corps Minnesota & Iowa.

  • related content

  • Brianna Thompson, Jenny Carlenberg and Zoë Webb spent four weeks camping and forging friendships while working on public lands for Conservation Corps Minnesota.

  • Brianna Thompson, left, and Zoë Webb cleared a small stream of invasive plants that were clogging the waterway for native trout.

  • get related content delivered to your inbox

  • manage my email subscriptions

Click here to send us your hunting or fishing photos – and to see what others are showing off from around the region.

ADVERTISEMENT

NY Mets 3 Bottom 9th Inning
St. Louis 2
Pittsburgh 4 Bottom 9th Inning
Atlanta 2
Miami 7 Top 7th Inning
Washington 7
Detroit 4 Bottom 9th Inning
Philadelphia 4
Minnesota 6 Top 9th Inning
Baltimore 5
NY Yankees 4 Top 6th Inning
Houston 0
Tampa Bay 2 Bottom 8th Inning
Boston 1
Baltimore 4 Bottom 9th Inning
Toronto 2
Cincinnati 1 Bottom 2nd Inning
LA Angels 0
Chicago Cubs 3:05 PM
Kansas City
Los Angeles 3:05 PM
San Francisco
Chicago WSox 3:05 PM
Cleveland
Milwaukee 3:05 PM
Oakland
Seattle 3:05 PM
San Diego
Texas 3:05 PM
Los Angeles
Colorado 3:10 PM
Arizona
Arizona 3:10 PM
Colorado
Houston 99 FINAL
Washington 91
LA Lakers 0 1st Qtr 10:16
Brooklyn 2
Minnesota 3:00 PM
New Orleans
Philadelphia 3:30 PM
Cleveland
Detroit 5:00 PM
Miami
LA Clippers 5:00 PM
Boston
Dallas 6:00 PM
Indiana
Memphis 6:00 PM
San Antonio
Oklahoma City 8:00 PM
Phoenix
Washington 1 2nd Prd
NY Rangers 2
Calgary 4:00 PM
Nashville
Boston 4:00 PM
Carolina
Detroit 4:00 PM
NY Islanders
Florida 4:00 PM
Ottawa
Anaheim 6:00 PM
New Jersey
Chicago 6:30 PM
Winnipeg
San Jose 6:30 PM
Pittsburgh
Michigan State 43 2nd Half 15:06
Louisville 46
Gonzaga 4:05 PM
Duke
Philadelphia 4:00 PM
Chicago
Toronto FC 6:00 PM
Real Salt Lake
(7) Florida State 74 FINAL
(3) South Carolina 80
Villanova 60 2nd Half 0:32
West Virginia 58
Michigan 32 1st Half 3:40
Southern Miss 13
Temple 4:00 PM
Middle Tennessee
Siena 4:00 PM
Louisiana
St Marys-CA 4:00 PM
UCLA
(5) Baylor 7:30 PM
(2) Notre Dame
Connect with twitterConnect with facebookConnect with Google+Connect with PinterestConnect with PinterestConnect with RssfeedConnect with email newsletters

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

question of the day

Poll: Should the lake where the albino muskie was caught remain a mystery?

Weekly Question

ADVERTISEMENT

 
Close