Majors: The prestige, the pressure and the breakdown no one sees coming

  • Article by: DOUG FERGUSON , AP Golf Writer
  • Updated: July 16, 2013 - 2:15 PM

GULLANE, Scotland — Paul Azinger leaned against the railing around the 18th green at Muirfield, where 13 players have won the silver claret jug since the British Open first came to a links course known as the fairest of them all.

It sure didn't feel that way to Azinger.

Muirfield is where Nick Faldo won his first major championship by making 18 pars in the final round in 1987. It would not have been good enough if only Azinger's tee shot had not run into a bunker on the par-5 17th or his approach to the 18th had not found that bunker left of the green.

He made bogey on both holes. A one-shot lead became a one-shot loss.

"It could have scarred me," Azinger said. "But I didn't recognize the magnitude of what I was losing as much as I knew I could make history if I had won. And I didn't know 20 years later I was still going to be asked about it."

The topic this summer evening: As much as majors are won, how many more of them are lost?

Five years later, Faldo won again at Muirfield when John Cook missed a 3-foot birdie putt on the 17th and made bogey on the 18th to finish one-shot behind.

Faldo won the Masters three times, each time with plenty of help. Scott Hoch missed a 3½-foot putt for the win in 1989, and Faldo beat him on the next hole. A year later, Faldo won another green jacket when Raymond Floyd hit into the water on No. 11 in a playoff. And who can forget Greg Norman blowing a six-shot lead against Faldo in 1996, still the greatest final-round collapse in a major.

It takes something colossal for the runner-up to be remembered as much as the champion, but it happens. A lot.

The most famous was Jean Van de Velde losing a three-shot lead on the final hole at Carnoustie in 1999, the memory more vivid because the Frenchman rolled up his pants and stood in Barry Burn as he debated whether to play a ball submerged in the rising tide. Sam Snead thought he needed birdie to win the 1939 U.S. Open and chopped his way to a triple bogey, missing a playoff by two shots. He never won the U.S. Open.

Look back only one year ago to Royal Lytham & St. Annes, where Adam Scott had a four-shot lead as he stood on the 15th tee. Four bogeys later, Scott watched Ernie Els pose with the claret jug. Did Els win? Or did Scott lose?

"I think 100 percent of them are won," Azinger said.

That much is certain because the low score always wins in golf, provided the scorecard is correct (see Roberto De Vicenzo at Augusta National in 1968).

"But," Azinger continued, "I believe that a high percentage of them are handed to the winner."

Ben Curtis walked off the 18th green as Azinger was speaking. Curtis won the Open at Royal St. George's in 2003 after Thomas Bjorn took three shots to get out of the bunker on the 16th hole of the final round. Was his Open won or lost?

"It was won," Curtis said. "When I signed my card, it was over 72 holes. Not 71."

Curtis had finished his final round about an hour before the tournament was officially over. Els was standing by the putting green last year at Lytham.

Webb Simpson was in the clubhouse at Olympic Club last year when he won the U.S. Open. So was Geoff Ogilvy in 2006 at Winged Foot after a great par save that he figured was for second place in the U.S. Open. That was before Colin Montgomerie chunked a 7-iron from the fairway and made double bogey, and Phil Mickelson hit three poor shots in a row and also made double bogey.

  • get related content delivered to your inbox

  • manage my email subscriptions

ADVERTISEMENT

Baltimore - K. Gausman 1:20 PM
Chicago Cubs - J. Arrieta
Houston - B. Peacock 6:05 PM
Cleveland - C. Carrasco
San Francisco - T. Hudson 6:05 PM
Washington - D. Fister
St. Louis - A. Wainwright 6:05 PM
Philadelphia - K. Kendrick
Chicago WSox - J. Danks 6:05 PM
NY Yankees - S. Greene
Tampa Bay - D. Smyly 6:07 PM
Toronto - M. Stroman
Atlanta - M. Minor 6:10 PM
Cincinnati - M. Latos
Seattle - F. Hernandez 6:10 PM
Boston - J. Kelly
Kansas City - Y. Ventura 7:05 PM
Texas - C. Lewis
Pittsburgh - J. Locke 7:10 PM
Milwaukee - Y. Gallardo
Detroit - R. Ray 7:10 PM
Minnesota - T. Milone
Miami - H. Alvarez 7:40 PM
Colorado - F. Morales
San Diego - O. Despaigne 8:40 PM
Arizona - J. Collmenter
LA Angels - H. Santiago 9:05 PM
Oakland - S. Gray
NY Mets - J. Niese 9:10 PM
Los Angeles - D. Haren
Pittsburgh 21 FINAL
Philadelphia 31
Carolina 6:30 PM
New England
NY Giants 6:30 PM
NY Jets
Jacksonville 6:30 PM
Detroit
Oakland 7:00 PM
Green Bay
Chicago 9:00 PM
Seattle
Tampa Bay 8/23/14 3:30 PM
Buffalo
Tennessee 8/23/14 6:00 PM
Atlanta
Dallas 8/23/14 6:00 PM
Miami
Washington 8/23/14 6:30 PM
Baltimore
New Orleans 8/23/14 7:00 PM
Indianapolis
Minnesota 8/23/14 7:00 PM
Kansas City
St. Louis 8/23/14 7:00 PM
Cleveland
Houston 8/23/14 8:00 PM
Denver
San Diego 8/24/14 3:00 PM
San Francisco
Cincinnati 8/24/14 7:00 PM
Arizona
(21) Texas A&M 8/28/14 5:00 PM
(9) So Carolina
Wake Forest 8/28/14 6:00 PM
ULM
Boise State 8/28/14 7:00 PM
(18) Ole Miss
Tulane 8/28/14 7:00 PM
Tulsa
Temple 8/28/14 8:15 PM
Vanderbilt
Rutgers 8/28/14 9:00 PM
Washington St
Weber State 8/28/14 9:30 PM
(19) Arizona State
Real Salt Lake 8:00 PM
FC Dallas
Montreal 7:30 PM
Winnipeg
Toronto 8/23/14 3:00 PM
Edmonton
Calgary 8/24/14 2:00 PM
Ottawa
Saskatchewan 8/24/14 6:00 PM
Brt Columbia
Ottawa 8/29/14 6:30 PM
Montreal
Winnipeg 8/31/14 2:00 PM
Saskatchewan
Toronto 9/1/14 12:00 PM
Hamilton
Edmonton 9/1/14 3:30 PM
Calgary
Chicago 6:30 PM
Atlanta
Los Angeles 9:00 PM
Phoenix
Connect with twitterConnect with facebookConnect with Google+Connect with PinterestConnect with PinterestConnect with RssfeedConnect with email newsletters

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

 
Close