Frequent contributor Jon Marthaler has written about virtually every sport in the Twin Cities, and fills in on Saturdays for the RandBall blog on StarTribune.com. He'll cover the professional soccer scene in the Twin Cities, whether at the Metrodome or at the National Sports Center.

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Like the World Cup? Here's a handy guide to what to watch next

Posted by: Jon Marthaler under Soccer Updated: July 15, 2014 - 12:12 PM

So, new soccer fan: you've watched, and enjoyed, the World Cup. You're thinking that this soccer thing seems pretty fun, and you don't want to wait until the next World Cup - in June 2018, whole years from now! - to watch more soccer.

But what to watch? The USA men's team doesn't have meaningful matches again until next summer, and the women's CONCACAF championship isn't until October. It's a long time until you can again don your red, white, and blue scarf, and forget the words to "America the Beautiful." You need something now. It's time to dive into the glorious world of club soccer.

Years in the past, this meant pestering the kid who studied abroad one semester and came back with a Manchester United jersey and an annoying habit of saying "cheers" instead of "thanks," but I'm happy to report those days are long gone. You are awash in soccer choices. It's important to pick the right one. That's where SoccerCentric comes in; let us be your faithful Sherpa, guiding you among the mountains and helping you pick the right league for you.

The thing you liked best about the World Cup: Cheering for the Americans! U-S-A! U-S-A!
What you should watch: Minnesota United FC and the NASL

Minnesota's home team plays in Blaine; if you can't make it up there, their home games are broadcast on Channel 45, which you get at your house. The Loons are the home team, the local squad, and while it's true that the NASL is the American second division, it's also true that this doesn't mean Triple-A soccer. United's players aren't property of MLS teams, waiting for a callup to the big leagues; they've got their own championship to win. If you enjoyed being part of cheering for the home team, it’s America and Minnesota for you.

(A word to anyone who complains about the quality of American soccer, or says they won't get invested in Minnesota soccer until MLS comes here, or anything along those lines: oh, sorry this game isn't good enough for you, Bobby Robson. While you're over there pontificating on whether the game is worthy of your attention, the rest of us are going to be over here, actually watching soccer and having fun.)

The thing you liked best about the World Cup: That, unlike baseball or football or basketball, the games are over in two hours
What you should watch: MLS

Love American sports, but hate that an American League baseball game now takes four hours to play? Allow Major League Soccer to step in. You can transfer over all of your usual prejudices: it's still safe to hate New York and Los Angeles (though not the second LA team, which is in terrible shape because of a crazy owner.) If it's local prejudice you want, you can cheer against Chicago and Kansas City, and it's always fun for a Minnesotan to cheer against Dallas. Plus: Hate Boston? Well, New England is terrible and their owner (Robert Kraft, the Patriots' owner) is the worst in the league! Ah, delicious schadenfreude.

The thing you liked best about the World Cup: Drinking in the morning and yet feeling normal
What you should watch: The Premier League

NBC Sports Network shows all the English games, either live or online, which is great for those of us who are looking for something to watch at 9am on Saturdays. It's the most popular and richest league in the world, and no matter what team you choose to follow, you will easily find someone else in the area who will watch games at the bar with you. In some ways, the English league is the easiest league for Americans to follow - especially if you like a beer with your morning sausages.

The thing you liked best about the World Cup: GOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOL!
What you should watch: Liga MX

It is hard not to be taken by the irrepressible goofiness that is Univision during the World Cup. Spencer Hall covers it better here, but if you're a fan of zaniness and don't mind a Spanish-language broadcast, go ahead and find Univision or Telemundo on your dial.

Be aware when you do, too, that you'll be watching North America's best league, filled with entertaining, attack-minded players - and be aware that more of your fellow Americans are tuning in to watch along with you than are watching any other league. You may not know it, but the Mexican League is the popular pick among your countrymen.

The thing you liked best about the World Cup: That it doesn't come around that often
What you should watch: The Bundesliga

The German league is the best-attended in the world, and boasts Europe's current best team in Bayern Munich. Unfortunately, it's saddled with a TV contract with GolTV in the USA, a channel that nobody gets. It thus follows that if you're a Bundesliga fan, you don't have to bother with watching games until 2015-16, when FOX picks up the rights and you'll start seeing German matches everywhere.

The thing you liked best about the World Cup: The superstar players – Messi, Neymar, Ronaldo, etc.
What you should watch: La Liga

Real Madrid and Barcelona seem to have endless funds, which is why the world’s biggest stars all seem to end up with one of the two. And last year, neither one managed to win the league, losing out to Atletico Madrid, which had fewer superstars but a better team – just like what happened to Messi, Neymar, Ronaldo, etc. at the World Cup.

The thing you liked best about the World Cup: The allegations of match-fixing.
What you should watch: Serie A

In general, the Italian league is beset by a scandal of some type at least every other year. This being Italy, nothing is ever resolved, and any punishments handed out are overturned on appeal. If you loved the dramatics of the Cameroonian match-fixing probe – or even the story of the Ghana's players potentially going on strike if they weren’t paid – you’ll love Italy.

We here at SoccerCentric hope that this guide has helped you, and may we say in closing: Go [insert name of your new favorite team in whatever league matches your interest]!

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