Doug Smith

Even if the fish aren’t biting, the ducks aren’t flying and the pheasants aren’t flushing, Doug Smith says any day spent outdoors is a good day. A Minnesota native, he’s been covering the outdoors for the Star Tribune since 1995. He considers walleyes fried over a campfire to be gourmet cuisine.

Watermilfoil found in Le Homme Dieu, near Alexandria

Posted by: Doug Smith Updated: June 28, 2012 - 5:52 PM
 Eurasian watermilfoil continues to spread to Minnesota lakes.
This week it was discovered growing in Lake Le Homme Dieu near Alexandria in Douglas County.
A small patch of the nonnative, invasive aquatic plant was discovered by an angler Wednesday in the middle of the lake between the Krueger’s Creek and Rotary Beach public accesses. It was later verified by a DNR staff aquatic plant biologist.
Eurasian watermilfoil has now been found in more than 220 lakes, eight rivers or streams in Minnesota. Lake Le Homme Dieu is the second body of water in Douglas County found to have this invasive aquatic plant. The plant was discovered in Oscar Lake near Holmes City in 1992.
The DNR is conducting further surveys to determine the extent of distribution of the Eurasian watermilfoil in Lake Le Homme Dieu. Also, the agency will work with local groups and citizens to manage the invasive plant.
Here’s more from DNR news release:
Eurasian watermilfoil can form dense mats of vegetation and crowd out native aquatic plants, clog boat propellers, and make water recreation difficult. In Minnesota, this invasive plant has caused problems by producing extensive mats especially where water depths are less than 15 feet, water clarity is high, and the fertility of the bottom ranges from moderate to high.
Eurasian watermilfoil growth can be controlled but the plant usually cannot be eradicated.
To help stop aquatic hitchhikers such as Eurasian watermilfoil, the DNR urges boaters to be extra thorough in examining their boats before they leave a water access. Minnesota law prohibits boaters from transporting water from infested waters, aquatic plants from infested waters, and other prohibited invasives. Boaters may not launch watercraft with invasive species attached.
  • 0
  • Comments

Be the first to comment

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Connect with twitterConnect with facebookConnect with Google+Connect with PinterestConnect with PinterestConnect with RssfeedConnect with email newsletters

ADVERTISEMENT