According to Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf, as quoted on the company's website, "Integrity is not a commodity. It's the most rare and precious of personal attributes. It is the core of a person's — and a company's — reputation." Given the scandal of the cross-selling practices under his leadership, I suggest that Stumpf and the Wells Fargo board of directors review these words so boldly stated by him on the website.

JOHN SLETTOM, Anoka

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I'm struck by the irony of a member of Congress blaming another organization for "gutless leadership" ("Wells Fargo CEO lambasted over fake customer accounts," Sept. 21). It's Congress' abject failure to appropriately regulate the financial services industry that allows these policies to exist in the first place.

BRADLEY J. FROEMMING, Alexandria, Minn.

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U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren wants executives held criminally liable for deceptive practices perpetrated under their watch? She apparently holds her party's presidential nominee to a somewhat different standard. Shocking!

DAVID BRENTZ, Arden Hills

GUNS

No one wants to ban them, but not all owners are 'good guys'

Here we go again. Knee-jerk reactions ...(Readers Write, Sept. 21).

First, let's get this one out of the way: Nobody has advocated banning all handguns. It is a totally false statement and only used to inflame and get certain factions all riled up. I find it disappointing that such totally false narratives are even included in letters. Just because some may believe such nonsense doesn't mean it needs to be printed. Printing it only validates the lie.

Second, the good-guy-with-a-gun narrative: Where are those letters when there is a murder-suicide? Where are those letters when a bunch of people are gunned down in a church? Where are those letters when a sniper takes out a bunch of police in Dallas? Where are those letters when an unarmed African-American is gunned down by police?

I'm not saying that guns are bad or guns are good. Guns in the right hands and with proper training are what is needed.

That includes knowing the backgrounds of those seeking to own weapons, which is something a vast majority of NRA members agree on. It also includes proper training of all law enforcement on the use of deadly force.

We will never stop all gun deaths, but the knee-jerk reactions will not get us there.

TOM KRUEGER, Crystal

POLICE-INVOLVED SHOOTINGS

Online report failed by giving only one side of the story

The headline "Protesters confront police after shooting in Charlotte," posted on your website on Sept. 21, and the article's lead paragraph, "A black police officer shot an armed black man at a Charlotte, N.C., apartment complex ...," display an astonishing insensitivity to both the facts of this case and the national outrage inspired by the rash of extrajudicial police killings this country has witnessed during the last several months.

In the last 10 days alone, we have seen a black man killed while eating dinner in his own backyard in Broward County, Fla., after police were called to settle a domestic dispute. We have seen a 13-year-old boy, allegedly in possession of a toy gun, shot while fleeing police. And, finally, we saw Terence Crutcher shot while standing beside his stalled vehicle with his hands in the air.

In such a climate, is it any wonder that the people of Charlotte would respond with anger to another apparently unprovoked shooting? Your article fails to mention the witnesses who reported that Keith Lamont Scott was reading a book, waiting for his son to be dropped off after school when police arrived at the scene. It also omits mention of injuries to protesters and reporters in the confrontation. In fact, it appears that the writer took all his information from the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department — clearly not an unbiased source.

One would hope that the chief news outlet for a community still reeling from the death of Philando Castile might do more than parrot official police statements when reporting on police brutality. Evidently that is not the case.

REBECCA MOLLOY, Woodbury

DONALD TRUMP

He's getting off easy after using foundation funds to pay his bills

On Tuesday it was revealed that Donald Trump has taken more than a quarter-million dollars from his charity to settle lawsuits. On Wednesday, the news didn't even make the front page of the Star Tribune. Imagine for a moment the news media frenzy that would be erupting if we'd just learned that Hillary Clinton had stolen a quarter million-dollars from the Clinton Foundation and used it for personal purposes.

JASON MCGRATH, Minneapolis

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David S. Day's bet didn't pay off (Readers Write, Sept. 17). He worried that "headlines won't trumpet" what he called Trump's previous and new "falsehoods" about President Obama's birth. But the Star Tribune obliged, on page 1 of the same newspaper, by dutifully reporting and headlining both.

What I wonder is when the paper will similarly headline an "analysis" of Clinton's lies finally "collapsing" with respect to her confidentiality breaches, mishandling and evidence destruction concerning her secretary of state e-mails, the Clinton Foundation donations and special-interest access, the Benghazi attacks "video" origin, her health issues and, going back aways, the Rose Law Firm's "lost" records, Travel-gate at the Clinton White House, etc., etc.

I hope I'm surprised, but I wouldn't recommend a bet on that one.

DOUGLAS P. SEATON, Edina

KEEPING THE FAITH

There's help for those trying to recover from losing a child

Thank you for the wonderful article about life after losing a child. ("Turning ache into action," Sept. 18) Sadly, many Minnesotans like us are a part of this club that no one wants to join.

There was one critically important entity missing, however. Faith's Lodge was created by a Minneapolis couple after their daughter was stillborn. They built a lodge just two hours north of the Twin Cities in Danbury, Wis., in memory of their daughter, Faith.

Faith's Lodge supports parents and families coping with the death or medically complex condition of a child to reflect on the past, renew strength for the present and build hope for the future. As the only facility of its kind in the country, they've served over 6,000 people thus far and are open year-round for programming.

The people profiled in your story are exactly who Faith's Lodge is honored to serve. We only wish we would have known about Faith's Lodge when we lost our child in 2012. Thankfully we've had the opportunity to visit and are proud to share their mission.

Learn more at http://faithslodge.org/.

JAMIE and JORDAN LEOPOLD, Champlin