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MLB Draft Day Two: Twins take college pitchers in third and fourth rounds

  • Blog Post by: La Velle E. Neal III
  • June 6, 2014 - 2:20 PM

Missed this yesterday. The Indians drafted one of Harmon Killebrew's grandsons with the final pick of the Day 1.

In the third round, the Twins select San Diego State righthander Michael Cederoth, Cederoth is another power arm who projects to be a releliever. Here's BA's write-up:

Cederoth showed 94-96 mph heat at his best coming out of a San Diego area high school in 2011, but his delivery, command and maturity all needed work, so scouts were content to let him develop at San Diego State. He flashed great promise in his first two seasons at SDSU, but lapses of control kept him from achieving greatness as a starter, and the Aztecs moved him to the bullpen after one poor start this spring. He has flourished in a relief role, attacking hitters with an explosive fastball that sits easily at 94-97 mph and touches 98-100. Sometimes the heater is straight, but other times it cuts, whether by design or not. Cederoth tried to throw four pitches as a starter, but streamlining his repertoire has also helped his slider improve out of the bullpen, where it has shown later, harder break at 83-85 mph. His delivery still isn’t pretty, and his walk rate (5.5 per nine innings this spring) remains a red flag, so he’ll likely remain a reliever in pro ball. But he has big league closer upside, and he was generating late first-round buzz down the stretch this spring

Here's another profile of him, with video

In the fourth round, the Twins selected Sam Clay, a lefthanded pitcher from Georgia Tech. Here's what MLB.com had to say about him:

Clay was a two-sport star in high school and didn’t pitch much for the Yellow Jackets as a freshman, as he began concentrating on baseball for the first time. He took on a larger role in the bullpen this spring, becoming one of their most important relievers. Clay’s fastball typically sits in the low-90s and touches a bit higher. He complements it with a hard slider that flashes above-average potential. Primarily, Clay is a two-pitch pitcher, but he also throws a curveball and changeup at times. Though he has enough stuff to start, he is still somewhat raw and will need to improve his control. Clay is a Draft-eligible sophomore and would have two more years of eligibility if he chooses to return to school.

Here's a story about Clay

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