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Great Horned Owl and chicks

  • Blog Post by: Jim Williams
  • March 23, 2014 - 10:13 PM

A Great Horned Owl nest holding the hen and two chicks can easily be seen at Silverwood Park in St. Anthony. (Park personnel have established a limit to approach to prevent disturbing the birds.) The hen and her chicks are nesting in the hollow of a broken branch in a large tree very close to a paved walking path, about 30 feet up. Visitors should have no problem locating the birds. Just look for the photographers, ever-present at this unusual viewing opportunity. The young owls appear to be about six weeks old. The male owl often can be seen perched, sound asleep, high in a nearby tree. That bird, as you can see from the photo below (not a very cooperative bird) is much lighter than its mate. Coloration of this species is highly variable. This female has typical adult coloration. The male tends more toward the lighter birds found most often far north. Great Horned Owls can be so light as to resemble Snowy Owls. This one is far from that, but interesting nonetheless. The owls should be visible for several more weeks. Once the young birds leave the nest they often remain in its vicinity. To find them, drive to the park’s most distant parking lot. There is a paved walkway leading between two park buildings. Follow that pathway approximately 200 yards. You might also find interesting the courtship behavior of at least seven Eastern Chipmunks in a tangle of brush and fallen logs immediately to the right of the walkway from the best owl-viewing spot. Friday, they were chasing each other incessantly. The chipmunks are very obvious right under the eye of the female owl. The male owl, the family’s provider, sleeps during the day, hunting at night. Perhaps that explains the mammals’ apparent daytime nonchalance.

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