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The Cynema Soundfield from Niles Audio is a TV sound bar that hides in the wall. It mounts flush with the wall surface and is covered with a paintable grille.

MCT,

“Uncommon Cards:  Stationery Made with Recycled Objects, Found Treasures and a Little Imagination” by Jeanne Williamson offers instructions for 52 card designs.

MCT,

Creeping Charlie is an aggressive spreader that’s difficult to control.

Star Tribune file,

The toolbox: Sound bar, DIY cards, battling creeping Charlie

  • Akron Beacon Journal
  • August 27, 2013 - 4:07 PM

Sound bar hides in wall

Where’s that sound coming from?

The Cynema Soundfield from Niles Audio is a TV sound bar that hides in the wall. It mounts flush with the wall surface and is covered with a paintable grille.

The sound bar consists of a thin metal bracket that can hold three dual-speaker modules and an amplifier. It’s designed to bridge the wall studs, so there’s no need to cut or drill holes in them. Nevertheless, professional installation is recommended.

The Cynema Soundfield comes in 48-, 55- and 60-inch widths at prices ranging from $1,599 to $1,999. The 48-inch model is also available without an amplifier for $1,195.

To find a dealer/installer in your area, call 1-800-289-4434.

Make your own cards

A handwritten note takes on extra meaning when the card is homemade. Artist Jeanne Williamson provides ideas for creating your own in “Uncommon Cards: Stationery Made With Recycled Objects, Found Treasures, and a Little Imagination” (Running Press, $20).

Williamson offers instructions for 52 card designs, many incorporating such unusual materials as a bit of netting from a produce bag or the corrugated sleeve from a carryout coffee cup. Some cards are stamped, some are stitched, and all are unlike anything you’ll find in a store. Card stock is included to get you started.

Battling creeping Charlie

Q: How can I get rid of creeping Charlie in my lawn?

A: Creeping Charlie and ground ivy are common names for Glechoma hederacea, a lawn weed that’s aggressive and difficult to control. It creeps along the ground and puts down many roots along the length of its stem, making it hard to remove by hand.

Chemical herbicides can be used to control it, but the timing of the application is critical. The Michigan State University Extension recommends applying a post-emergent herbicide for broadleaf weed control in the fall, although the treatment can also be effective if it’s applied in spring when the weed is in flower.

The extension service recommends products containing the herbicide 2,4-D or a combination of 2,4-D, dicamba and MCPP or MCPA. If that doesn’t work, try a product containing triclopyr that’s designed for hard-to-kill weeds, such as Confront, Chaser, Battleship, Momentum or Ortho Weed-B-Gon Chickweed, Clover and Oxalis Killer.

 

 

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