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The 2011 performance by tUnE-yArDs, led by Merrill Garbus, is one of the more fondly remembered shows in recent years at the Cedar Cultural Center.

Leslie Plesser, Star Tribune file

Facts and favorites from the Cedar's past

  • Article by: CHRIS RIEMENSCHNEIDER
  • Star Tribune
  • August 18, 2013 - 11:12 PM

4 random Cedar facts

It used to be a movie theater. Opened in 1949, it was showing porn movies when it closed in 1973. It reopened for a while as an art film and performance space, with a sloped floor and fixed seats facing west toward where the artists’ green room is now. Offices are where the projector used to be.

Only a third of its revenue comes from ticket sales. With just beer and wine to offer (and coffee, soda and tea), it sees far less bar revenue than most venues. The rest comes from arts grants, corporate sponsors, foundations and private donations.

About 500 volunteers help run the place. That’s the estimated number in the current team, whose only payment is free access to shows.

It’s increasingly touted as one of our best music venues. I called it “the warmest listening room in town” in May, and City Pages named it “best concert venue” in its Best of the Twin Cities 2013 issue.

10 personal best

I’ve only been around for 11 of the Cedar’s 24 years, but that’s long enough for ample standout gigs.

1. Ryan Adams, June 2007

2. Geoff Muldaur and Dave Ray, November 2002 (Ray’s last show)

3. Alejandro Escovedo, February 2002

4. Fleet Foxes, October 2008

5. “Twin Cities Funk & Soul” release party, September 2012

6. Vic Chesnutt, November 2009 (also his last local gig)

7. Mavis Staples, November 2010

8. Happy Apple, January 2003

9. Antibalas, September 2012

10. Greg Brown, one of those years

CHRIS RIEMENSCHNEIDER

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