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Unearned runs from Lackey's error lead to Twins victory

  • Article by: HOWARD ULMAN
  • Associated Press
  • May 10, 2013 - 7:23 AM

BOSTON - John Lackey looked sharp throwing to home plate. Tossing to second base was his downfall.

The Red Sox starter had allowed just one run through five innings. Then his wild throw on a potential inning-ending double play grounder started the Minnesota Twins to a 5-3 win over Boston on Thursday night.

"I thought I pitched really well," Lackey said. "It's not that complicated. I have to make that one play and we win the game. One play ruined it all."

The Twins scored four unearned runs in the sixth after Lackey fielded Trevor Plouffe's grounder and fired it past the outstretched glove of second baseman Dustin Pedroia into center field.

"You've got to take care of the ball," Pedroia said. "Pitching and defense is a big part of winning ball games."

The Red Sox lost their third straight and sixth in their last seven and dropped out of first place in the AL East for the first time this season. They're percentage points behind the New York Yankees and tied with the Baltimore Orioles for second.

"I don't think anybody is worried about the last seven games," Pedroia said. "It is the big leagues and everybody is good."

The Twins went into the sixth trailing 2-1 and, with the help of Oswaldo Arcia's two-run homer, came out of it with a 5-2 lead. They finished their road trip at 5-5 and moved 2 1-2 games out of first place in the AL Central.

Lackey (1-3) pitched well until his error, then came back to pitch a perfect seventh before Koji Uehara took over in the eighth. Lackey allowed six hits and one walk and struck out eight. The Red Sox finished with 11 strikeouts, the 21st time in 35 games they've had at least 10.

Boston threatened with one out in the eighth when Daniel Nava walked and Will Middlebrooks reached first when shortstop Eduardo Escobar bobbled his grounder. It was the Twins' first error in 12 games. But Burton struck out Stephen Drew and Mike Carp.

"The errant throw opened the door for them," Boston manager John Farrell said.

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