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From the Travel Desk: Fliers, avoid your neighbors' onboard peeves

  • Article by: KERRI WESTENBERG
  • Star Tribune
  • April 5, 2013 - 9:38 AM

When on an airplane, what’s your pet peeve? I asked that question in a blog several weeks ago, and readers had lots to say. I share their thoughts here in the hope that offenders will be mindful of their actions’ effect on others — and perhaps (oh please) amend their ways. I am fresh off a flight, and it’s tough up there, especially if your neighbors act, even unwittingly, in ways that drive you mad.

A self-described tall man reflected others’ concerns when he wrote, “You haven’t lived until the person ahead of you reclines his/her seat back in a big hurry. My knees hurt yet today at the thought.”

“My pet peeve is individuals who insist on keeping the armrest up as they cannot fit in their seat without spilling over into mine,” tucsongirl wrote.

Regionguy doesn’t like when people sitting at the back of the plane stuff their luggage into the overhead bins at the front of the plane. Dmogck complained about people from the back of the plane scooting up the aisle hoping to get off faster. La55122 wrote, “How about parents pushing the age limit for buying seats for children over age two? Don’t expect the person next to you to share their space with your squirming kid.”

“My travel pet peeve actually involves a pet,” wrote SusanneT. A small dog (that should have been in a carrier) scampered over her toes to get to its owner’s nearby seat.

Bstickers wrote what anyone stuck with an offending row mate might contemplate: “I don’t understand why so many people get bent out of shape on short two- to three-hour domestic flights. I can do three hours standing on my head between two fat people hold crying babies.”

But let’s hope it never comes to that.

 

Send questions or tips to Kerri Westenberg at travel@star tribune.com, and follow her on twitter @kerriwestenberg.

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