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Jodi Adkisson worked out at Sky Zone in Plymouth.

Elizabeth Flores, Star Tribune

How I Got This Body: Jumping into fitness

  • Article by: SHEILA MULROONEY ELDRED
  • Special to the Star Tribune
  • October 27, 2012 - 3:38 PM

After Jodi Adkisson's husband died in 2010 and her father fell ill with acute lymphoblastic leukemia last year, her first instinct was to take care of everyone else: her 18- and 7-year-old daughters, her mother and other family members. She even hosted a huge fundraiser for her parents to help pay her father's medical bills. The stress took its toll and she finally realized she'd been neglecting herself. She found her center again in an unlikely spot: at an indoor trampoline park far from her home. But once she started SkyRobics classes in Plymouth, she knew she never wanted to stop. A year later, she's 100 pounds lighter, wearing a size 8 instead of 16, and still head over heels for trampoline workouts.

'BEST BUTT-KICKING EVER' "I was 230 pounds and I said, 'OK, this is ridiculous.' Someone told me about SkyRobics at Sky Zone ... I can tell you, it feels like you're going to die. It's one of the hardest workouts ever -- and I used to be a trainer. The first month was a journey, but I was not giving up. I thought, it's got to get easier! And then it became addictive. I can't explain to people how much it means to be so healthy. I travel 36 miles round trip to get there. I stopped drinking pop and Caribou to pay for it. I had to take something I loved and put it into something else that was healthier."

A NEW NORMAL "Sometimes my heart is sad; I really miss my husband. This is a whole new normal. But I do know I'm in control of what makes me happy. At first I was doing the class once a week, then two times, and then about six days a week. Now I'm into a trend of four times a week. It's also the best mental therapy I've ever experienced. I'm finally taking care of me."

JUMP AROUND "Jumping on a trampoline is difficult. Then you add SkyJacks, which is jumping jacks on a tramp. Then running laps -- that is probably my favorite part; it's serious cardio, because when you're stepping on the trampoline you're using more muscles. We also do things with the medicine ball, we do moves from yoga to Pilates to step -- it's a wide variety in one hour. We do resistance against a wall. If I do the same thing at home without a trampoline, I don't feel it. I've had some athletic people come to class and at the end they say, 'THAT was a workout.' We do butt drops, where you fall on your butt and stand up -- and then throw a ball and catch it. It's extreme muscle control."

ONE PAGE AT A TIME "There isn't a perfect body, but you can tell that everybody has a story. Sometimes I tell the story about my husband passing because I want people to appreciate what they have. It's going to be a journey for the rest of my life, to find balance. I tell my girls that life is a book, and you need to enjoy the story. If you jump to the end, it's not as fun. And if today isn't a good page, tomorrow might be a better one."

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