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Weekend Links with Jon Marthaler: A Timberwolves writer gone far too soon

  • Blog Post by: Michael Rand
  • August 11, 2012 - 4:36 PM

 

Each week, commenter Jon Marthaler bakes up a delicious batch of links for you. Other times, you can find him here. Jon?

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Wednesday, we found out that Tim Allen, a local Timberwolves writer, had passed away suddenly and unexpectedly. It's a shocking loss for those of us who followed him online, because just two days earlier he was discussing the Wolves and posting about things outside of basketball he found interesting, the same as he always did.

Tim and I wrote for the same site, Canis Hoopus - he wrote much more often, and much more cogently, than I ever did - but I never had the chance to meet him in the real world. I can't comment on his personality, only his writing, but about that I can say that he was my favorite Timberwolves writer, and in general I liked to read his opinion of any Timberwolves opinion before discussing it with others, just so I could make sure that I agreed with him and was therefore "right."

He's been a regular part of the Weekend Links over the years; if there was a Wolves link, it more than likely came from him, and so as a memorial this week I'd like to share some of my favorite posts of his that I linked to here on RandBall, over the years:

 

 

I bid him farewell; he left us far too soon.

On with the (rest of the) links:

*Joe Posnanski's over at the Olympics, writing for his new Sports on Earth venture, and he's killing it. We recommend his story of Carl Lewis's world-record long jump that never was, the story of Australian sprinter Peter Norman - better known as the third man in the most iconic Olympic photo in American history, and his interview with NBC Sports Olympics honcho Dick Ebersol, which confirms that NBC views the Games as television, not as sports.

*Closer to home, Parker Hageman reviews how the Twins' Scott Diamond is dominating without having obviously great stuff.

*And finally: Sports Media Watch has found the photo that sums up the state of women's sports media coverage, these days.

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