With an insider’s eye, Hot Dish tracks the tastiest bits of Minnesota’s political scene and keep you up-to-date on those elected to serve you.

Contributors in Minnesota: Patrick Condon, J. Patrick Coolican, Patricia Lopez, Ricardo Lopez, Abby Simons, Rachel E. Stassen-Berger and Glen Stubbe. Contributors in D.C.: Corey Mitchell, Allison Sherry and Jim Spencer.

Posts about Gov. Mark Dayton

Dayton dashed from event, avoiding waiting media

Posted by: Rachel E. Stassen-Berger Updated: October 23, 2014 - 7:26 PM

With questions about the state's health exchange and Republican campaign ads swirling, Gov. Mark Dayton dashed from a Thursday afternoon event about housing without taking questions from the waiting press.

Dayton's decision to leave the event through a side door with his staff was unexpected. His staff had indicated he would answer questions from reporters.

It was also unusual. The DFL governor generally makes himself available to the media.

Dayton, who is up for re-election in 12 days, made remarks at the Minnesota Housing Finance Agency Housing Awards announcement in St. Paul, listened to comments from two lawmakers and then, about 25 minutes in to the event got up to leave.

His spokesman, Matt Swenson, said the governor said as he left that he would not take questions from the press. Reporters who followed him out of the side door he exited saw his state vehicle exit the building's rear parking lot.

On Thursday, the Star Tribune reported that the Dayton administration had sought lower rates from an insurer that signed up to provide health insurance through MNsure, the state's health exchange. That insurer, PreferredOne, dropped out of the exchange this year.

Republican candidate for governor Jeff Johnson said Dayton should have stayed to answer questions about that.

"That’s part of the job of the governor whether it is him, me or someone else," Johnson said. He suggested the Dayton administration is panicking over the recent MNsure news.

He pledged that if he were governor, he would not avoid reporters.

"I will never unexpectedly run away from you," he said.

Also Thursday, the Minnesota Republican Party decided to delete the photo of a young boy who died from abuse in a television commercial trashing Dayton. That decision came after pressure from the boy's grandmother.

Thursday afternoon Dayton appeared at a campaign event with former U.S. Sen. Hillary Clinton. He was also slated to appear at a fundraiser with the former first lady in the evening.

Photo: The governor's caravan driving away from Thursday's housing event. Source: David Joles, Star Tribune.

Updated

Minn. GOP will stop using photo of abused child in TV ad after grandmother complains

Posted by: Patrick Condon Updated: October 23, 2014 - 3:59 PM

(Updated 4 p.m.)

The grandmother of 4-year-old Eric Dean, whose death by abuse in 2013 exposed gaps in Minnesota's child protection services, said Thursday that the state Republican Party agreed with her request to remove the child's photo from a TV ad critical of Gov. Mark Dayton. 

"Our family's trying to heal, and with this now, it's bringing everything up again and it's just so hard to move on," Yvonne Dean told the Star Tribune. "This type of ad campaign needs to stop." 

Yvonne Dean said she got several calls Thursday morning from Republican Party chairman Keith Downey about the ad, after she called the party seeking to get the ad taken down. Dean said Downey initally told her the party felt within legal rights to reference the case and include an image of Eric Dean. A short while later, she said Downey called back to say the image of Eric would be removed from the ad. 

Downey did not respond to an interview request. The party released a statement shortly after noon apologizing for not notifying the Dean family prior to the ad, and saying it would remove Eric Dean's picture from the ad. 

"The ad is currently being revised and an edited version will begin airing as soon as possible," the party statement said. Yvonne Dean said Thursday afternoon that after some misunderstandings, she was willing to accept an ad that showed a headline about the case, but did not include the picture of Eric or a specific mention of his case. 

Yvonne Dean, who lives in Starbuck, is the mother of Eric's father, David Dean. Amanda Peltier, who was married to David Dean and was Eric's step-mother, was convicted of the boy's murder and is now serving a life sentence. 

Yvonne Dean's concerns about the ad were first reported Wednesday night by Michael Brodkorb, a former Republican political operative who now blogs for the Star Tribune. 

Eric Dean's death in 2013 was preceded by 15 reports of maltreatment. Last May, before the details of Eric Dean's death were widely known, the Legislature passed and Dayton signed a law that forbid county agencies from considering past abuse reports that were rejected when deciding whether to investigate a new report. 

The ad, titled "Incompetence" and paid for by the state GOP, began airing this week. It criticizes Dayton for his handling of several controversial issues, including the Dean case. Over dual images of a Star Tribune front page with a picture of Eric Dean on the front, and a picture of Dayton, the narrator says it was "downright horrifying when he signed a law making it more difficult to investigate maltreatment cases."

The bill at issue got votes from both DFL and Republican lawmakers when it passed last May. After details of Dean's death became publicly known, Dayton and the bill's backers said they had not foreseen that the provisions in the bill could make it more difficult for authorities to respond to multiple reports of child abuse. 

Dayton, who also said he believes Pope County officials bear the brunt of responsibility for not responding properly to the abuse reports, has since convened a task force on child abuse and charged it with proposing law changes to address gaps in the child protection system. 

Dayton's Republican opponent, Jeff Johnson, has been critical of Dayton's role in the legislation, though his campaign was not involved in preparing the ad in question. Yvonne Dean, who described herself as a Republican, said she hoped Johnson's campaign would condemn the use of the case in the ad. 

The Johnson campaign released a statement saying it was the right call to remove the image from the ad, and expressing condolences to the Dean family.

Minnesota candidates: In profiles and photos

Posted by: Rachel E. Stassen-Berger Updated: October 21, 2014 - 10:00 AM

For months, Star Tribune staff has traipsed along with Minnesota's statewide candidates as they campaigned.

Here's what they found of the men who will vie in November's election:

For Minnesota governor 

Democrat Mark Dayton

An A-list player in state politics for more than three decades, Dayton, 67, has had a colorful career full of highs and lows, in both public and private. On Election Day he will learn if Minnesotans are willing to give him four more years in charge of the state — or are ready to send him into retirement. -- Patrick Condon

Republican Jeff Johnson

A Hennepin County commissioner who is a former state representative and Tea Party ally, Johnson is now battling to unseat the most powerful Democrat in state office, Gov. Mark Dayton. Johnson says he offers a clear and needed alternative to the policies of a Democratic governor and Democratic Legislature that have joined forces and moved Minnesota too far to the liberal left. -- Rachel E. Stassen-Berger

For the U.S. Senate

Democrat Al Franken 

Franken is defending himself with the same head-down, workmanlike approach that has characterized his time in office.

Winning his first term in 2008 by the narrowest margin in modern U.S. Senate history after a brutally combative race, the former satirist has spent five years playing it safe. His standard event is heavy on policy, in front of a crowd that generally loves him, with a humorous punchline to chase. -- Allison Sherry

Republican Mike McFadden

The art of campaigning hasn't’t come easily to McFadden, an investment banker who has never held elective office, and hadn't voted in a primary in 20 years before his own. Yet McFadden beat out a field of experienced politicians for the Republican endorsement, easily won his primary and gained the backing of Independence Party leaders who chose him over their own primary winner.

McFadden says his great asset is that he's not a politician, nor was he bred to be one. He doesn't need this job, but he wants it. -- Abby Simons and Ricardo Lopez


All photos by Glen Stubbe, of the Star Tribune. Click below to see the Star Tribune's photo galleries of the candidates:

Mark Dayton

Jeff Johnson

Al Franken

Mike McFadden

Dayton, Johnson spar over education, divided government in fourth debate

Posted by: Ricardo Lopez Updated: October 19, 2014 - 10:39 PM

Student-loan debt, the job market for recent college graduates and even a question on favorite ice cream flavors were among those asked during Sunday's debate between gubernatorial candidates Gov. Mark Dayton and Republican challenger Jeff Johnson.

Held at Hamline University, the debate was the fourth face-off between Dayton and Johnson, a Hennepin County commissioner. It was the first debate of two debates to be held in the Twin Cities.

The candidates were more subdued and cordial than in recent confrontations but nonetheless outlined starkly different visions for the state.

Asked how they would preside over a divided legislature, Johnson and Dayton sparred over how they have worked with members of their opposing parties and disagreed on the worthiness of one-party rule in state government. Dayton said that if Minnesotans are satisifed with policies made by the DFL-controlled Legisture, they should vote for that to continue. Johnson said divided government has hisotorically been a good thing for the state. 

"I think you just have to look at my record in the House," Johnson, a former state representative said. "What you've done is the best way to tell what you're going to do." 

Johnson said that during his time as a state lawmaker, the House was controlled by Republicans but the Senate had a DFL majority. He touted his work with DFL lawmakers on eminent domain and identity-theft bills. He blamed Dayton for presiding over the state's government shutdown in 2010.

Dayton defended the clash with Republicans that led to the shutdown, saying he shared responsibility for it with lawmakers but that the outcome -- a tax hike on the wealthiest 2 percent of Minnesotans to balance the state budget -- was worth it. 

"The Republican Legislature would rather raise a billion-and-half through additional borrowing than raise taxes on the richest people of Minnesota. Fortunately, that changed when we had a DFL Legislature," Dayton said. 

Questions for Sunday's debate, sponsored by Fox 9, came from a panel of political reporters from two local newspapers and public radio, as well as through social media and students who were present at the forum. 

The two candidates fielded questions on how they would work to reduce student-loan debt and improve the job market for recent graduates. 

Dayton touted a tuition freeze bill  he signed last year that affected state colleges and university as an example of how he has helped keep rising college costs in check. Johnson said he would work to cut administrative costs. 

To improve the job market, Dayton said that investing in higher education and early childhood education programs would be critical. "If we do that, the opportunities are going to be out there," he said.

Johnson responded by criticizing the state's tax and regulatory climate, saying it has hurt the state's competitiveness and "because of that, the good jobs are being created in other states."

Before Sunday's debate, Independence Party candidate Hannah Nicollet and her supporters protested outside of Hamline's Klas Center over her exclusion from the forum. Nicollet, a former software developer, participated in two previous debates in Rochester and Moorhead. 

Dayton and Johnson will debate once more before the general election on Nov. 4. 

Today in the governor's race: busy Friday, debate this weekend

Posted by: Patrick Condon Updated: October 17, 2014 - 10:07 AM

Minnesota's candidates for governor are keeping busy Friday as they prepare for another debate this weekend, the first in the Twin Cities. 

Gov. Mark Dayton is speaking Friday morning at a leadership summit of the Minnesota State College Student Association in Bloomington.

Dayton also has an active official schedule Friday, with a handful of events closed to the press: a conference call with executives at BNSF Railway and Minnesota Power; a special Cabinet meeting for an update on Minnesota's Ebola preparedness and prevention efforts; and an evening banquet of the Minnesota State Fire Chiefs Association. 

Republican Jeff Johnson does not have public events on his calendar Friday. His campaign said he would be fundraising and doing media interviews, and on Saturday had plans for retail campaigning in a number of locations. 

Hannah Nicollet from the Independence Party has several campaign events Friday and Saturday as well. She's appearing Friday night on Duluth Almanac Extra, and at a Saturday conference in favor of marijuana legalization. 

Dayton and Johnson are set to debate Sunday morning. It will be aired live on Fox 9 in the Twin Cities. 

ADVERTISEMENT

Connect with twitterConnect with facebookConnect with Google+Connect with PinterestConnect with PinterestConnect with RssfeedConnect with email newsletters

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT