With an insider’s eye, Hot Dish tracks the tastiest bits of Minnesota’s political scene and keep you up-to-date on those elected to serve you.

Contributors in Minnesota: Patrick Condon, J. Patrick Coolican, Patricia Lopez, Ricardo Lopez, Abby Simons, Rachel E. Stassen-Berger and Glen Stubbe. Contributors in D.C.: Corey Mitchell, Allison Sherry and Jim Spencer.

Posts about Health care

Dayton dashed from event, avoiding waiting media

Posted by: Rachel E. Stassen-Berger Updated: October 23, 2014 - 7:26 PM

With questions about the state's health exchange and Republican campaign ads swirling, Gov. Mark Dayton dashed from a Thursday afternoon event about housing without taking questions from the waiting press.

Dayton's decision to leave the event through a side door with his staff was unexpected. His staff had indicated he would answer questions from reporters.

It was also unusual. The DFL governor generally makes himself available to the media.

Dayton, who is up for re-election in 12 days, made remarks at the Minnesota Housing Finance Agency Housing Awards announcement in St. Paul, listened to comments from two lawmakers and then, about 25 minutes in to the event got up to leave.

His spokesman, Matt Swenson, said the governor said as he left that he would not take questions from the press. Reporters who followed him out of the side door he exited saw his state vehicle exit the building's rear parking lot.

On Thursday, the Star Tribune reported that the Dayton administration had sought lower rates from an insurer that signed up to provide health insurance through MNsure, the state's health exchange. That insurer, PreferredOne, dropped out of the exchange this year.

Republican candidate for governor Jeff Johnson said Dayton should have stayed to answer questions about that.

"That’s part of the job of the governor whether it is him, me or someone else," Johnson said. He suggested the Dayton administration is panicking over the recent MNsure news.

He pledged that if he were governor, he would not avoid reporters.

"I will never unexpectedly run away from you," he said.

Also Thursday, the Minnesota Republican Party decided to delete the photo of a young boy who died from abuse in a television commercial trashing Dayton. That decision came after pressure from the boy's grandmother.

Thursday afternoon Dayton appeared at a campaign event with former U.S. Sen. Hillary Clinton. He was also slated to appear at a fundraiser with the former first lady in the evening.

Photo: The governor's caravan driving away from Thursday's housing event. Source: David Joles, Star Tribune.

Updated

Franken: Override 'Hobby Lobby,' make contraceptives more available to women

Posted by: Abby Simons Updated: October 16, 2014 - 6:24 PM

U.S. Sen. Al Franken reiterated his stance Thursday that the U.S. Supreme Court’s Hobby Lobby decision that limited access to birth control must be overridden, in a women’s health roundtable in St. Paul that focused largely in the fallout from this summer’s Hobby Lobby ruling.

The ruling, in which the U.S. Supreme Court said that requiring corporations to pay for insurance coverage for contraception violated federal law protecting religious freedom. Franken told the panel of assorted women lawyers, citizens and advocates that it ruling must be overturned.

“This turns on its head the whole notion of freedom of religion,” Franken said. “To me, it’s about the freedom of a woman, in this case, to choose whether she wants to use contraception or not. Because of the (Affordable Care Act) it’s a basic, effective, essential healthcare.”

Franken said he is open to FDA review of making oral contraceptives more accessible to women—a position McFadden has taken. However, he added that the key issue is that it be covered by insurance, not how accessible it may be.

“The issue here isn’t where you get it,” he said. “It’s who pays for it.”

The roundtable included Winnie Williams of Woodbury, a mother of two teenage daughters, one with a benign brain tumor with symptoms treated thorough a specific kind of birth control.

“When I look at this issue, I look at it and say ‘You just told me and my daughter that we might not be able to have control of excessive bleeding, depression, migraines, brain tumors,” she said. “You’re telling me that my employer controls whether I have that as part of my medical care. And that, to me, is just unconscionable.”

McFadden, however, said Franken’s criticism of Republicans on women’s issues an “election year gimmick” in efforts to distract Minnesotans from current issues like Ebola and the ongoing Islamic State threat.

“You’ve seen this play out all across the country. It’s right out of the Democrats’ political guidelines as this is how we try to divide people.” McFadden said.

Franken said Thursday that the roundtable was to address issues important to women and men alike.
“The job of a senator is to pay attention to a lot of things all at one time,” he said.

Minnesota physicians' PAC backs Dayton for re-election

Posted by: Patrick Condon Updated: October 2, 2014 - 1:34 PM

A political action committee representing Minnesota physicians endorsed Gov. Mark Dayton for re-election on Thursday. 

MEDPAC is the political arm of the Minnesota Medical Association. The PAC's board of directors, made up of physicians, decided on the endorsement. 

In a news release, the group praised the incumbent Democrat for supporting the group's agenda "on almost every issue." Specifically cited was the budget Dayton signed last year, which restored medical education funding and increased physician payment rates; and Dayton's support for a tobacco tax increase, more money for newborn screening, prohibiting minor access to tanning beds and restrictions on e-cigarettes. 

"Dayton has showed time and time again that he supports the MMA's advocacy efforts on behalf of the doctors and patients of the state of Minnesota and for that he deserves our support," said MEDPAC chairman Michael Tedford, an Edina physician. 

MEDPAC endorses candidates for office and contributes to the campaigns of endorsed candidates. It's supported by voluntary contributions from its members, and does not receive money from the larger Minnesota Medical Association or its member dues. 

Democrats, Republicans seize on MNSure rate increase to score political points

Posted by: Ricardo Lopez Updated: October 1, 2014 - 3:24 PM

After state officials said Wednesday that rates on the MNsure health insurance exchange will increase an average of 4.5 percent, Democrats praised what they called a modest rise while Republicans seized on the figure, calling it "bogus" and "deceptive."

In a short address with reporters, Gov. Mark Dayton said the rise in the average rate was "predominately good news," praising Minnesota for having among the lowest insurance premiums in the country, according to state officials. 

State Senate Minority Leader David Hann, R- Eden Prairie, and Rep. Joe Hoppe, R-Chaska, delivered the response for Republicans. Hann attacked the 4.5 percent figure, arguing that it masks what are larger rate increases for certain plans, participants and regions. 

The MNsure rates releases comes hours before Gov. Dayton and GOP challenger Jeff Johnson are set to square off the first gubernatorial debate of the election cycle. In statement, Johnson criticized Dayton for what he called a failure to deliver on a promise that MNsure would decrease the cost of health insurance for middle-class Minnesotans. 

"Time and time again, Mark Dayton has failed to deliver on his promises to middle-class Minnesotans," Johnson said. "In fact, the only promises he's kept are the ones he's made to the special interest groups who fund his campaign."

Wednesday's rise in the average rate was no surprise, according to analysts. That's partly because PreferredOne, the Golden Valley-based insurer, announced last month it would leave MNsure and not sell policies for 2015, according to Commerce Commissioner Mike Rothman. PreferredOne currently offers the lowest-cost options on MNsure.

Prior to Wednesday’s announcement, health insurance experts pointed to other factors also could be driving premium increases. MNsure will withhold a larger share of premiums next year to cover the cost of the exchange. Health costs are growing, in general, and more patients with costly health problems likely will move from a state safety net program to MNsure.

McFadden: Repeal Affordable Care Act in favor of state-based exchanges

Posted by: Abby Simons Updated: September 26, 2014 - 3:48 PM

U.S. Senate candidate Mike McFadden on Friday laid out a proposal to do away with the Affordable Care Act in favor of optional state exchanges with the opportunity to buy insurance across borders.

The proposal is part of a six-page detailed outline by McFadden, a Republican businessman who is challenging U.S. Sen. Al Franken. McFadden has long advocated for repealing the ACA.

“I fundamentally believe that healthcare should not be done at the federal level, but should be state-based and market-centered,” McFadden told reporters Friday. “I think if it continues to be run and administered at the federal level, it will ultimately look like the (Veterans Administration) and that’s not acceptable and that’s not what Minnesotans want.”

McFadden’s proposed system includes a six-point plan to lower costs by expanding Health Savings Accounts, increasing price transparency for medical procedures, allow the pooling of small businesses to procure the same benefits as larger corporations, allowing the purchase of insurance across state lines, and reforming both healthcare tax laws and the tort system.

McFadden said that individual states should be able to decide whether they want to issue individual mandates to purchase health insurance.

“If Minnesota wants to have a mandate or Massachusetts wants to have a mandate, then that’s their decision.” He said. “When I say that states are laboratories for experiments, I want them to experiment. You run into a fundamental problem with a program that’s this large, and covers 1/6th of the economy.”

McFadden maintained that last week’s pullout of PreferredOne, the chief provider in MNsure, is not the fault of the state’s health care exchange, is proof that large patient pools are not effective.

"I'm here to tell you today these pools under Obamacare are not working." he said. "When PreferredOne, who is the 60 percent low-cost provider, comes in and says 'We can't make money,' that's not MNsure, the exchange's fault. What it is, is that the system can't make money."

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