With an insider’s eye, Hot Dish tracks the tastiest bits of Minnesota’s political scene and keep you up-to-date on those elected to serve you.

Contributors in Minnesota: Patrick Condon, Baird Helgeson, Patricia Lopez, Jim Ragsdale, Abby Simons, Rachel E. Stassen-Berger and Glen Stubbe. Contributors in D.C.: Allison Sherry, Corey Mitchell and Jim Spencer.

Posts about Minnesota governor

On tax filing deadline, Dayton touts benefits of cuts

Posted by: Abby Simons Updated: April 15, 2014 - 3:54 PM

Touting millions of dollars in savings for Minnesota taxpayers on Tuesday’s filing deadline, Gov. Mark Dayton said he hopes for another round of cuts benefiting homeowners and working parents.

“I believe there will be another tax cut bill that will come after the Legislature returns,” he said. “I’m hoping for property tax relief and also the childcare tax credit that was in my original message and which I still believe would be of enormous benefit to people whose childcare costs are going up astronomically. It’s staggering to me how very young families are spending $10-15,000 per child. That’s outrageously high costs and we need to do something to relieve that burden.”

Dayton made the comments after declaring Tuesday “Tax Cut Day,” introducing two families who benefited from the $508 million in tax cuts: the Zuzeks of Hastings, who benefit from college tuition tax deductions for their three children, and Kristy and Aaron Norman of Rochester, who saved $800 in state taxes related to the adoption of their two children.

 With hours left to go before the filing deadline, Minnesota Department of Revenue Commissioner Myron Frans said 2.2 million Minnesotans filed their taxes as of Monday night, with 500,000 to go.

Dayton said the tax cuts are another step forward, calling Minnesota a “high tax state but a high value state.”

“We have an excellent workforce, people who are hardworking, educated and company after company has been expanding here in Minnesota at a pace that exceeds the nation because they recognize the value.” he said.

The cuts follow a $2.1 billion tax increased imposed last year.


 

Dayton signs historic minimum wage increase into law

Posted by: Baird Helgeson Updated: April 14, 2014 - 2:32 PM

DFL Gov. Mark Dayton signed into law a dramatic increase in the state’s minimum wage Monday, giving raises to more than 325,000 Minnesotans.

The new $9.50 base hourly wage takes the state from having one of the lowest minimum wages to one of the highest when it fully kicks in by 2016.

“Minnesotans who work full-time should be able to earn enough money to lift their families out of poverty, and through hard work and additional training, achieve the middle-class American Dream,” said Dayton, surrounded by legislators, labor and labor leaders at a ceremonial bill signing in the State Capitol rotunda. “Raising the minimum wage to $9.50, and indexing it to inflation, will improve the lives of over 325,000 hard-working Minnesotans. I thank the Legislature for recognizing the need to make work pay in Minnesota.”

Minnesota’s dramatic wage increase puts the state at the forefront of a major initiative of President Obama, who has failed to persuade Congress to raise the federal minimum wage to $10.10 and instead focused on pressing his case state by state.

The state’s higher minimum wage has angered Republicans and business leaders, who say the higher wage will force them to lay off workers and become a drag on the fragile economic recovery.

“We believe that all Minnesotans deserve the dignity of supporting themselves and their families through hard work,” said state Rep. Ryan Winkler, a Golden Valley DFLer who was a chief negotiator of the minimum wage effort. “Raising the minimum wage and indexing it to inflation is an important step to create a rising floor for all wages that will benefit hundreds of thousands of Minnesotans who work hard and deserve to get ahead.”

At $6.15 per hour, Minnesota has one of the lowest minimum wages in the nation, lower than neighboring Wisconsin, Iowa, North Dakota and South Dakota. Minnesota is one of only four states with a minimum wage below the national rate of $7.25 per hour.

State officials estimate that the $9.50 base wage will put an additional $472 million in the pockets of Minnesota’s lowest-wage workers each year. Supporters say the increase in consumer spending is expected to help local businesses in communities across our state, and provide another boost to Minnesota’s growing economy.

“Today represents a big step forward for low-wage workers in our community,” said Sen. Jeff Hayden, a Minneapolis DFLer who was a chief supporter of the wage-hike measure. “We rely on these workers every day, yet many of them cannot support their own families. Raising the minimum wage is part of a larger effort to lift up the working poor and ensure all Minnesotans have the opportunity to earn enough to get by.”

A Minnesotan who earns $6.15 per hour work full-time earns an annual salary of just $12,792, about $7,000 below the poverty line. Raising the minimum wage to $9.50 per hour comes within $30 of closing that gap for the year.

To help small businesses, the bill also establishes lower minimum wage requirements for small employers and young workers once the new law takes effect Aug. 1.

On Monday afternoon, minimum wage hike to $9.50 becomes law

Posted by: Rachel E. Stassen-Berger Updated: April 11, 2014 - 10:47 AM

DFL Gov. Mark Dayton will usher in a new era of wage hikes for Minnesota's lowest paid on Monday.

The measure will, over time, raise the minimum wage from one of the nation's lowest to one of its highest.

Right now, the state's minimum for most employers is $6.15 an hour. With the new law,  it will be $9.50 an hour by 2016.

"The governor is looking forward to signing a bill into law that will improve the lives of over 300,000 Minnesotans," Matt Swenson, Dayton's spokesman, said.

Dayton will sign the measure into law Monday at 2:30 p.m. at the Capitol. Advocates who have pushed Democrats to increase the wage floor for two years are expected to crowd into the rotunda for the event.

Photo: A February rally backing the minimum wage hike//Associated Press

Minnesota Senate passes $100 million in tax relief

Posted by: Baird Helgeson Updated: April 10, 2014 - 5:09 PM

Minnesotans would get more than $100 million in tax relief as part of a proposal that sailed through the Minnesota Senate on Thursday with bipartisan support.

The measure includes tax relief for businesses, veterans and transit users. It also provides tax breaks for volunteer emergency responders, parents who pay for tutors and people who lost their home through foreclosure or a short sale.

The measure, which passed 57-6, expands the local sales tax exemption for local governments. It also eliminates sales taxes for snowmobile clubs, post-season high school events and nonprofit fundraising groups.

This is the second tax relief bill of the legislative session, coming just a month after legislators approved $443 million mostly in income tax cuts.

Legislators are paying for the tax relief out of the $1.2 billion projected budget surplus for the remainder of the fiscal period. They have also set aside $150 million to increase the state's rainy-day fund.

Republicans who voted against the newest tax-relief measure have pressed Democrats to return a larger share of the surplus to taxpayers.

The Senate bill differs dramatically from a similar measure on the House, which would spend about the same amount of money, but directs it largely toward property tax relief.

If legislators are committed to passing more tax relief, House and Senate leaders will have to work out their differences in coming weeks before the legislative session adjourns.

DFL Gov. Mark Dayton said he is open to approving more property tax relief this session.

Dayton delays State of the State address until April 30

Posted by: Baird Helgeson Updated: April 9, 2014 - 7:24 PM

Gov. Mark Dayton is postponing his State of the State speech one week until April 30, his office announced Wednesday.

The governor has been recuperating from hip surgery and had planned to give his annual address the week before.

“The governor would simply like more time to prepare his remarks,” said Linden Zakula, s Dayton spokesman.

The governor is scheduled to give the address in the House chambers, with House members and state Senators present.

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